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Eugene Weekly : Music : 04.21.05

World Fusion Pioneers

Ancient Future brings 'organic dance music' to Eugene.

BY VANESSA SALVIA

Quick, how many people can you name who coined a term describing a popular musical genre? If the name Matthew Montfort didn't jump to mind, you've probably never heard of Ancient Future, a Bay Area-based band in their 27th year.

Ancient Future Far Horizons School, 2490 Hilyard St., 8 pm Thursday, April 28/ $13 adv/$17 door. Tickets available at StarGate Books, 1374 Willamette, 687-0282.

In 1978, Montfort called Ancient Future "world fusion music" to explain his motivation for combining ideas from many musical traditions. But Montfort would take umbrage at the word genre. "It is a process that actually creates tradition," he said. "When different cultures get together and learn from each other, each culture will have developed a certain musical knowledge kernel."

The band's name, Ancient Future, illustrates Montfort's desire to take music from the past and bring it into the future. "The traditions are very old and the knowledge of these traditions needs to be a part of future traditions," he said.

Ancient Future began as a quartet but has grown to include 25 masters of numerous musical traditions the world over. Montfort leads four touring versions of Ancient Future, with the arabic fusion version touring the Northwest during Spring 2005. "It's great music to dance to," he said. "People go to raves and all that, well this is organic dance music!"

Montfort, who plays scalloped fretboard guitar (combining South Indian vina and steel-string guitar), is joined by Georges Lammam, a Palestinian from Lebanon who plays Arabic violin and sings, Azerbaijani percussion master Salah Takesh, and Doug McKeehan on keyboards. Ancient Future's 2003 CD Planet Passion is 12 tracks arranged in chapters chronicling a relationship's arc: Flirtation, courtship, sacred eros, the wedding, seduction and longing for the beloved.

Nineteen masters of musical styles as diverse as Indian, Cuban Celtic, Jewish and Chinese converged to give life to lovely tracks like "Forest Frolic," I Mett Her in the Medowe" and "El Zaffa." The CD is rich with melodies and quiet moments in sound from around the globe; perfect for yoga, meditation, dancing, dinner or just plain listening!

 

 

 

Better Together

Music Alliance brings together Eugene's finest.

BY MELISSA BEARNS

The Music Alliance Fridays @ The Countryside, 9 pm 565 Harlow Rd, Spfd. Saturdays @ Peabody's, 9 pm

It wasn't a table for outsiders. Even the conversation was tight, the stories bouncing back and forth as rhythmically as a four count. A group of guys you wouldn't normally see together — a businessman, a quiet guitarist who lets loose on stage, a boisterous Southern-born black singer and an Italian sax player — hanging out in the cool darkness of the Countryside Tavern, having lunch and talking about the thing that brings them together, the one thing that's been a constant for them throughout their lives: music.

Peter Giri, Paul Biondi and JC Rico are arguably three of Eugene's finest musicians. They've gigged with each other more times than any of them can remember and when they're together, they banter back and forth shooting ideas, stories and all-in-fun insults across the table like machine gun rounds.

"There's a language entertainers have that nobody understands but us," Rico said. "Normal people don't know what it's like to be on the road in some raggedy-ass motel with the couple in the next room pounding the bed against the wall and cockroaches in the bathroom. When we're together, that language we have makes us laugh."

Along with half a dozen other local musicians, they form the nucleus of the Music Alliance, a loose-knit partnership between area musicians who play regular shows at The Countryside and Peabody's. Instead of competing with each other for gigs and publicity, they promote and play at each other's shows.

It started at Peabody's as a jam every Saturday night. Even with no promotion, the show brought in a larger audience every week until Saturdays were standing room only. "But there was no vision for it," Jay Alderson said. "And no promotion at all."

Alderson saw the potential for something bigger. "We were looking for a band that was a combination of all the great players in town," he said. "There hasn't been a blues, rock, gospel crossover in this town in decades and there is too much talent here for something big not to happen."

The idea for a collective of musicians working and playing together in a way that supports and benefits everyone involved is nothing new. Back in the '70s and early '80s Eugene had a musician's union complete with dues and regular meetings. But the union eventually closed shop as the core blues/rock/gospel musicians moved away and the scene that had supported it disappeared.

Alderson, who worked with Bill Graham and watched him put the Doobie Brothers together, was willing to throw in some of his own money to get the musicians he wanted together on the same stage. As word spreads the crowds get bigger — Peabody's is packed shoulder to shoulder on Saturdays and the Music Alliance added a Friday show at The Countryside in early 2005.

"When I came into it I had just been playing gigs on my own," Rico said. "But when you get this group together, well, that's a lot of power on that stage. I wouldn't miss that for anything."

With an onstage chemistry that's more explosion than slow simmer, the Music Alliance puts on a booty-shakin', jivin' thing that gets little old ladies out grooving on the dance floor next to swing dancing 30-somethings.

This Saturday's show (4/22) brings together some of the Music Alliance's top players including Rico, Biondi, Giri, Kenny Reed (drums), Byron Case (bass), Mo'Fessor (keyboards) and Blue (harmonica) for what promises to be quite a show.

 

 

Sole Seeker

The War On Self Tour

BY MELISSA BEARNS

Sole's got too much to say about the real stuff to waste his words on bullshit about bling and bitches. This is hip hop for smart people, with big four-syllable words and bigger concepts and ideas.

Sole, Pedestrian, tel. jim jesus, The War On Self Tour. Monday, 3/25, 8 pm. WOW Hall, $10adv/$12 dos.

He calls his most recent release, Live From Rome, on Anticon "the first album I've done that's political," but that's not exactly accurate. Sole has been political since he was just a kid growing up in Portland, Maine and putting out records on vinyl with the money he earned flipping burgers at McDonald's.

What sets him so far apart is that he's humble and he's a seeker. On the phone, in person, in his music, everything is an exploration that starts with a question. "I've got further to learn than I've got to say / Furthermore, I'm never taking a step for granted / Nevertheless, I'm at odds with the fact that I'm just one character on a stage / Oddly enough, designed to make it to the next page," he says in "Furthermore" off Bottle of Humans.

By his late teens/early 20s, he'd started traveling to New York regularly and the 1997 release of Live Poets 12 led to collaboration with other up-and-coming artists including doseone, Atmosphere and the Shapeshifters. His horizons got wider and his rap more political as he focused on societal paradigms, toppling each one like a house of cards with acerbic rhymes and wit.

"I've always had my beliefs and my ideas," he said, talking on the phone from some parking lot in New England on his way to New York City. "But I can't put something on a record unless I'm 100 percent solid on it. I'm not going to talk about Israel unless I understand the conflict. I just try to be careful when I'm pointing the finger that I think I'm right."

He doesn't read newspapers much any more, just books. The most recent was "some Marxist literary critique." And while Sole takes on the biggest issues facing us personally and globally, the sly humor and self-reflection in his songs keeps them from ever getting too dark.

"There's so many times I thought I should write a philosophy book or make a documentary," he said. "But those things take time and it would just be more generic leftist fucking fodder that no one reads. As a rapper in this field, there's a lot of space to say what I want. Because not many people are approaching it this way."

 

 

Short Stories, Renegade Songs

Tim Kasher brings The Good Life to Eugene.

BY MOLLY TEMPLETON

Despite a brief residence in Portland awhile back, The Good Life (and Cursive) leader Tim Kasher hasn't been to Eugene since he was 10, when he visited a nearby relative. "I remember walking around a cute little downtown," he says. "And I had gone to the river to pick up crawdads."

The Good Life, The Velvet Teen, Bella Lea, Consafos. WOW Hall • 8:30 pm Friday, April 22 • $8 adv/$10 dos

That sounds about right.

This week's visit might be a little different for Kasher, who's headed to town with The Good Life. Kasher's last three releases — Cursive's The Ugly Organ and The Good Life's Lovers Need Lawyers EP, a collection of "renegade songs," and Album of the Year — have a mountain of glowing reviews between them; The Ugly Organ appeared on more than a few best-of lists at the end of 2003. Following jaunts through Europe and Japan, The Good Life are on the brink of a second U.S. tour for last fall's Album of the Year, the band's third album.

Album isn't exactly the self-aggrandizing title it might appear. Musically, it's a conscious shift to a stripped-down, acoustic guitar-based sound — a step away from the burbling synths, plinking keys, doubled vocals and electronic impulses of the band's previous album, Black Out, a remarkable, bipolar paean of self-analysis.

Lyrically, Album is the story of a relationship, one year long, one song per month, laid out in the CD booklet as a small calendar. The year-long cycle was something Kasher had in mind for some time; he says Cursive's Domestica wanted to be this cycle, but it didn't work out. But he's not sure Album worked out either. "I thought I was writing this really linear, cohesive collection of music, but it came across to a lot of people as 12 vignettes, short stories with a similar subject. Some people got it. I wasn't accurate enough, or descriptive enough. But that's OK."

Both with Cursive and The Good Life, Kasher's songs spark an intensely personal reaction among listeners, a reaction due in part to his confessional but saccharine-free lyrics. It's strange, then, to be in a room where people are pumping their fists in the air without a shred of irony as Kasher yells, "Cut it out/ Your self-inflicted pain/ Is getting too routine," in Cursive's "Art is Hard."

"I think about that too much," he says. "I think about it enough that I bounce back and forth whether or not I want to keep playing and releasing music. It's a lot of internal conflict for me. I don't think it's wrong at all, it's just … I don't know." Kasher pauses, and adds, "That's really a whole different article."

 

 

Music Shorts

EW writers take a look at the local music scene.

Trippy Techno

It took long enough but the people with the power finally figured out that Sound Tribe Sector 9 (STS9) is not a jam band. For years STS9 was booked as the opening act for bands who spend most of their shows noodling away on their instruments, lost in a haze as the patchouli-scented crowd sways and does that flowy hand dance.

STS9

But they've graduated to more appropriate pairings — Tortoise, Mr. Lips, the Perceptionists and Blackalicious to name just a few more recent shows. And while publications such as Jambase still take an interest in STS9, possibly because they sometimes have a floating, ethereal feel, the word is finally out that this is a genre-bending, magical melting pot of sound.

It's 2 pm somewhere in Texas and guitarist Hunter Brown is just rolling out of bed after staying up until 5 in the morning working loops and mixing beats on his laptop in the back of the tour bus. He's remixing songs off the band's most recent release, Artifact, and working on his own side projects.

Back when Brown, keyboardist David Phipps, bassist David Murphy and percussionst Jeffree Lerner first started out, STS9 spent about 200 days a year on the road playing their vibey, free form, jazz-meets-electronic-meets-drum and bass-meets-hip hop to anyone who would listen. Now that they're established, they have a more sane touring schedule.

But that hasn't changed their strange take on music, like someone never told them what it's supposed to sound like or how you're supposed to make it. Take Artifact for example — you can download one song, "Tokyo," off their website (www.sts9music.com).Check out the spooky loop at the beginning and the hip hop-inspired scratch-infused end. The full CD is packed with more amazing stuff. Listen carefully to "8 and a Extra" and "People's Part II." Hear anything that sounds like five guys "going completely ape shit on anything we could find," in an empty 8,000-square-foot warehouse with 10 microphones?

Boxes of glass for recycling smashing against the wall. Cell phones feeding back. The whir of a vacuum cleaner. Metal striking metal. Crazy energy released then sampled and morphed into rhythmic music that moves. STS9 play 8 pm at the McDonald Theatre at Saturday, 4/23, $18 dos/adv. — Melissa Bearns

 

 

On the Yellow Brick Road to Hip Hop Holy Land

The Living Legends' rise to stardom is nothing short of inspirational. It is a testament to the hip hop "dream," where a hip hop holy land promises success along with continued underground credibility. All you must do to get there is work hard and stay true to your craft and crew.

Their tale is as follows: Between Oakland and LA, a group of small-time, like-minded MCs found each other and formed a crew. They debuted their live routine at loft parties, collecting other like-minded members along the way, steadying their roster at eight strong. Eventually the group released an album together, toured the country (then Europe), released solo albums (as well as inner-group collaborations — different Legends' MCs performing together), and got back together to release several more collaborative albums. Soon the group found themselves blowing up all over the world.

Somewhere, somehow, the Living Legends have found that balance between fame and craft. Their new album Classic proves that it is possible to attain notoriety while still maintaining one's artistic integrity. The album blossoms with bouncy, straight-ahead hip hop beats that feature all the solid bumps and soulful samples that make up classic rap tracks. On "Brand New," the group tears through staccato rhymes and a wonderfully harmonized chorus all over an old school Slum Village-styled groove. "Blast Your Radio" features the man with the Midas touch, Madlib, on production duties.

While hip hop offers an infinite space in which to grow and develop, from hustling mix tapes on the streets to playing at Eugene's McDonald Theatre, the Legends really have come a long way. Jedi Mind Tricks and Pigeon John are supporting the Legends for their highly anticipated return to Eugene. Living Legends, Jedi Mind Tricks and Pigeon John play 8 pm, Sunday, April 24 at the McDonald Theatre. $15 adv. — Steven Sawada

 

 

Chamber Pop Confessions

The weakest moment on Over the Rhine's new album, Drunkard's Prayer, is easily pinpointed: the damn saxophone solo on "Little Did I Know." It's jarring, a strange switch to a sort of pop-jazz that seems to scribble all over an otherwise lovely tune.

Up to that point, the album glides along sleepily, Karin Bergquist's breathy, unaffected voice resting lightly atop a simple piano or guitar line, the occasional harmony breaking in. There's an old-timey beauty to the first half-dozen songs, a set of classic-sounding melodies that smartly leave plenty of aural white space around Bergquist's voice. "Hush Now (Stella's Tarantella)" begins with a charming Tom Waits-ian piano bit, a hint of vaudeville. But two songs later, following the unfortunate sax solo, Drunkard's Prayer begins to take on a decidedly Dawson's Creek tone, relying too heavily on a back-and-forth between bland mid-tempo cheeriness and overwrought melancholy that brings to mind a montage from a teenage heartbreak.

The good songs, though, make you want to give Over the Rhine a chance. They certainly do a decent piano ballad tinged with strings — probably the reason the band's been described as "confessional chamber pop." Over the Rhine has opened for Bob Dylan and been honorary members of the Cowboy Junkies. Their musicianship and the economy of sound on their better tracks, proves that they really do know what they're doing.

Over the Rhine plays at 8:30 pm, Saturday, April 23 at the WOW Hall. $15. — Molly Templeton

 

Divine Kinnie Starr

Kinnie Starr

Canadian diva Kinnie Starr returns to Eugene wrapping up her most recent tour in support of Sun Again, her newest release. If you missed her last time she breezed through town, don't make that same mistake again.

A modern-day musical goddess, Starr has the poise of a swan, the grace of a panther, the gentleness of a cloud and the power of hurricane. She'll croon a love song one second then get up in your face, rapping and rhyming the next.

She mixes gritty urban beats with sensual lyrics creating songs that bump and glide at the same time. Her themes range from feminism to food to earth worship and she infuses every song with an element of spirituality that's all about heart and staying real.

The way she rampages across musical genres with blithe disregard makes her one of the most innovative and fresh voices to grace our fair city in months. Kinnie Starr plays with the Ovulators at 9 pm Friday, April 27 at Sam Bond's Garage. $5. — Melissa Bearns

 

 




eugene/spfd.

ART OF EVERYTHING All Ages

513 E. MAIN ST., COTTAGE GROVE 942-6174

SA: Tony Kaltenberg—8

AX BILLY GRILL & SPORTS BAR

999 WILLAMETTE ST. 484-4011

SA: Group Therapy—8; Jazz

THE OL' HOWL & SMASH WILL PROBABLY LOOK HAPPIER WHEN THEY PLAY THE BLACK FOREST ON WEDNESDAY.

BLACK FOREST

50 E. 11TH ST. 686-6619

TH: Tripwire—9:30

FR: Avid, Like Breathing—9:30

SA: Arse, Sunken Grade, Takimoto—9:30

SU: Texas hold 'em—2

Caught in the Act Karaoke—9

MO: Caught in the Act Karaoke—9

TU: Acoustic Monk, Kimberly Freeman, Justin Ray—9:30

WE: The Blimp, The Frozen Torso Heap, The Ol' Howl & Smash—9:30








GIRLYMAN, A "MODERN DAY PETER, PAUL AND MARY - ONLY EDGIER," PLAYS CAFÉ PARADISO WEDNESDAY NIGHT.

CAFÉ PARADISO

115 W. BROADWAY 484-9933

TH: Keiskagato

FR: Poker Night—7

SA: Lucy Kaplansky—8; Singer-songwriter

MO: Band open mic night—7:30

TU: Acoustic open mic night—7:30

WE: Girlyman, Kym Tuvim—8






CARROWS LOUNGE

1807 OLYMPIC, SPFD. 746-9081

SA: Karaoke w/ Natalie—9

CLUB TSUNAMI

2222 CENTENIAL BLVD.

SA: DJ Tekneek—10:30; Hip hop, R & B

COFFEE GROVE COOPERATIVE

510 E. MAIN ST., COTTAGE GROVE 942-8847

FR: Fortune Cookie—8; Jazz, blues

SA: Prairie Dawgs—7; Bluegrass, Americana


COUNTRY SIDE RESTAURANT

4740 MAIN ST. 744-1594

TH: Line dance lessons—7

FR & SA: Wild Rose Band

SU-TU: Karaoke—8

WE: Fenceline




COUNTRYSIDE

645 RIVER ROAD 463-7632

FR: Music Alliance Show Jam—8:30

COZMIC PIZZA@THE STRAND All Ages

8TH AVE. & CHARNELTON ST. 338-9333

TH: Mark Hummel & Johnny Dyer—8; Blues

FR: Flowmotion—9

SA: Salsa dance w/ DJ Jose Cruz, Salseros Dance Group—8:30

SU: Straight No Chaser—6; Jazz

MO: Subdivide and Conquer: A Modern Western—7; Film

TU: Open mic night—7

WE: Jazz music for the young and young at heart w/ Paul Biondi—7







DA HOUZE

915 OAK ST., DOWNSTAIRS 345-7878

TH: Old School Karaoke, Kamikaze Hip Hop—8

FR: Rob and Carlos present Hip Hop Live—9

SA: DJ Mead—9

MO: Metal Trilogy Mondays—9

WE: Free Sushi Wednesdays—10





DOWNTOWN LOUNGE

959 PEARL ST. 343-2346

TH: Open turntables—10; Funk, R&B, hip hop

FR: Pummel, Evelate, Wetsock—10; Rock

SA: The Quick & Easy Boys—10; Cowboy glam rock

SU: Texas hold 'em—3

Kung Fu Karaoke—10

MO: DJ Diablo & DJ Turbo—10; Funk, rock, requests

TU: Free pool—10

WE: Texas hold 'em—7

The Hounds—10









DUCK INN

1795 W. 6TH. 302-9206

TH & SA: Ben Coleman's Karaoke—9

EMBERS SUPPER CLUB

1811 HWY. 99 N. 688-6564

TH: Billy McCoy—9; Country

FR & SA: Michael Anderson Trio—9; Variety, country

WE: Billy McCoy—9; Country



EUGENE WINE CELLARS

255 MADISON ST. 342-2600

WE: The Tomcats—6; Rock, variety

GAME DAY SPORTS BAR

1156 HWY. 99 607-2485

SA: Coastline—9:30; Rock

GOOD TIMES

375 E. 7TH AVE. 484-7181

TU: Rooster's Blues Jam—8

JAXX LOUNGE@PREMIUM POUR

1010 OAK ST. 485-4695

TH: Echoes of the Underground w/ DJ Myron, DJ Scamp & Twitch—10

FR: Livin' Funky Fridays w/ DJ Myron & DJ Scamp—10

TU: Drummers' Lounge—9

WE: Acoustic Live w/ Rigo—8:30




JO FEDERIGO'S

259 E. 5TH AVE. 343-8488

TH: Jo Fed's All Star Jazz Jam Session—9

FR: The Victor Noriega Trio—9

SA: Skip Jones' Spirit of New Orleans—9

SU: Mark Alan—8; Jazz

MO: Skip Jones Hammond Organ Trio—8

TU: Barbara Dzuro—8; Jazz piano

WE: Olem Alves & Mike Hanns—8







JOE'S BAR & GRILLE

25 W. 6TH 221-3360

TU: DJ Tekneek—10; Hip hop, R & B

JOGGER'S BAR & GRILL

710 WILLAMETTE ST. 343-0224

FR & SA: Motion Nightclub—9; Hip hop, house, 80s disco

MO: Working Man's Blues Jam—9

WE: Motion Nightclub—9; 80s, house, hip hop



JOHN HENRY'S

77 W. BROADWAY 342-3358

TH: '80s Night w/Chris, Jenn and John—10

FR: Todd Snider, South Austin Jug Band—8:30

SA: Freaks in the House w/ DJ Steve Sawada & The Audio Schizophrenic—10

SU: John Henry's Broadway Revue—10; Burlesque

WE: DJ Kal El vs. DJ Tekneek—10; Reggae vs. hip hop





THE JUNGLE

23 W. 6TH AVE. 338-9000

TH: Wisdom—8

THE KEG

4711 W. 11TH AVE. 345-5563

SA: Dancing—9

LATITUDE 10 CAFE All Ages

2757 FRIENDLY ST. 343-3460

SA: Barbara Dzuro—6; Piano

LAVELLE'S WINE BAR & BISTRO

5TH ST. PUBLIC MARKET 338-9875

TH: Skip Jones—5; New Orleans piano

FR & SA: Gus Russell—5; Jazz piano

WE: John Crider—5; Jazz piano



LONE STAR BAR & GRILL

33301 VAN DUYNN, COBURG 686-8686

TH: Karaoke/dancing—9

FR: Coyote Ugly night—9; Dancing, karaoke

SA & MO: Karaoke/dancing—9

WE: Coyote Ugly night—9; Dancing




LUCKEY'S CLUB CIGAR

933 OLIVE ST. 687-4643

TH: Deke Falcon, The Sweater Club, Cerulean—10; Indie, rock

FR: The Dimes, The High Holies, Camaro Hair—10; Indie, 80s rock

TU: The Warsaw Poland Bros., Crater—10; Ska, reggae, funk

WE: The Pasties, The Waltz Convention—10; Indie




LUNA

30 E. BROADWAY 434-5862

FR: Erik Muiderman—6:30; Singer-songwriter

Jake the Cat—9; Funk

SA: Erik Muiderman—6; Singer-songwriter

Toby Koenigsberg Trio w/ Tim Willcox—8:30; Jazz

 





MAC'S AT THE VET'S

1626 WILLAMETTE ST. 344-8600

TH: Mac's & Mo's Jamm

FR: Juke Joint Blue—9:30; Blues

SA: The Paul DeLay Band

WE: Christie & McCallum




MCDONALD THEATRE All Ages

1010 WILLAMETTE ST.

FR: Latino Music Festival—8

SA: Sound Tribe Sector 9—8; Funky jam, groove

SU: Living Legends, Jedi Mind Tricks, Pigeon John—8; Hip hop

MO: The Wailers, deSol—8; Reggae




MCSHANE'S BAR & GRILLE

86495 COLLEGE VIEW ROAD 747-4031

FR: Reeble Jar—9; Funk, jam, groove

MO: Micro Movie Night—8 & 11


MONROE STREET CAFE All Ages

1193 MONROE ST. 343-0863

TH: "bob"—8; Singer-songwriter

FR: Jeremy Frog

SA: Amy & Public Liar

SU: Poetry open mic—7

MO: Jon Itkin

TU: Andy White

WE: Open mic—7







MULLIGAN'S PUB

2841 WILLAMETTE NO PHONE

SU & WE: Music jam/open mic w/ Keith Harrison

THE O BAR & GRILL

115 COMMONS 349-0707

TU: Karaoke w/ Jared—9

OREGON ELECTRIC STATION

27 E. 5TH 485-4444

FR & SA: Don Latarski Group—8; Jazz

OVERTIME GRILL

770 S. BERTELSEN 342-5028

TH: Blues Jam—8

PEABODY'S

444 E. 3RD AVE. 484-2927

TH: Nancy Ream & Mercury's Refrain—9; Jazz

FR:  Tim & Tonic—8; Rock, variety

SA:  Music Alliance Show Jam—8:30

TU: Patrick & Giri—8; Hot & tasty acoustic




PERUGINO

767 WILLAMETTE ST. 687-9102

TH: Old-time jam—7:30; Appalachian

TU: Tango night w/ Andrew McCullough—7:30

WE: Irish jam—7:30; Celtic



QUACKER'S

2105 W. 7TH 485-5925

SA:  Voodoo Mt. Zydeco—9

TU: Karaoke w/ Jon-Michael—9

WE: Blues Jam—8:30

 




RAMADA INN

225 COBURG 342-5181

FR & SA: Coupe DeVille—9:15; Classic rock

RED LION INN

205 COBURG RD. 342-5201

SU: Blues jam w/ Jerry Zybach—7

THE CASEY NEILL BAND PLAYS SATURDAY AT SAM BOND'S.

SAM BOND'S GARAGE

407 BLAIR 431-6603

TH: The Tarbox Ramblers, Micah Sykes—9; Rock

FR: Grasshoppah, The Rosehip Ramblers—9; Acoustic

SA: Casey Neil Band—9:30; Rock

SU: Irish Jam—4

Bingo w/ Tom & Scott

MO: The Write Off Tour—8:30; Spoken word

TU: Sam Bond's Bluegrass Jam—9

WE: Kinnie Starr, The Ovulators—9; Rock








SAM'S PLACE

825 WILSON ST. 484-4455

TH: Bingo—7

FR: Paradox—9

SA: '80s Night

SU: Auditions for hosts & contestants for upcoming events, musical & other—8




SPIRITS

1714 MAIN ST., SPFD 726-2972

FR & SA: Go 2 11—9; Rock

STACY'S COVERED BRIDGE

401 E. MAIN ST., COTTAGE GROVE 767-0320

WE: Open Mic Night w/Ron O'Keefe—8:30

SWEETWATER'S

VALLEY RIVER INN 687-0123

FR: The Deb Cleveland Band—8:30; Blues

SA: West Coast Rhythm Kings—8:30; Swing

 



TAYLOR'S BAR AND GRILL

894 E. 13TH AVE. 344-6174

TH: DJ Smuv & DJ Tekneek—10; Hip hop, R & B

SU: Free pool

MO: Hip Hop vs. Dancehall w/ DJ Tekneek

TU: Karaoke

WE: Android Ethic





TINY TAVERN

394 BLAIR BLVD. 687-8383

MO: 15 Minutes of Fame w/ Ol' What's His Name's Open Mic—9

WE: DJ Secret Hippie's Disco Inferno


TRACKSTIRS

3350 GATEWAY, SPFD. 747-0332

FR: Karaoke & dancing w/ Jared—9

WETLANDS

922 GARFIELD ST. 345-3606

SA: Genus Pro, Debaser, SoundProof, 3 Blind Mics, DJ Cade—10; Hip hop

 


OVER THE RHINE APPEAR SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE WOW HALL.

WOW HALL All Ages

291 W. 8TH AVE. 687-2746

TH: Northwest Royale, On the First Day ... They Were Kittens, Idle Class, Paranos—8:30; Hard rock

FR: The Good Life, The Velvet Teen, Bella Lea, Consafos—8:30; Indie rock

SA: Over the Rhine—8; Folk rock

MO: sole, pedestrian, tel.jim.jesus—8:30; Hip hop

TU: Rumah Sakit, Chevreuil, By the End of Tonight —8:30; Rock

WE: Junior Reid, Reggae Angels—9

 







CORVALLIS

AJ'S

137 SW 2ND. 752-7570

FR: Richard Hedders, The Overtones—9:30

SA: The Dimes, Ahimsa Theory—9:30


BEANERY All Ages

2ND ST.

SA: Two Easy—8

BOMBS AWAY CAFE

2527 MONROE AVE. 757-7221

FR: The David Samuel Project—9:30; Blues, jazz, funk

HEADLINE CAFÉ

300 SW JEFFERSON 758-1642

TU: Two Easy—7:30

IOVINO'S RISTORANTE

126 SW 1ST ST. 738-9015

SA: Wendy James & Dan Andrews—9; Jazz

WE: Thriving Improv Theatre—9


MURPHY'S

2740 SE 3RD ST. 738-7600

SA: Caught in the Act—8:30; Funk, soul

PLATINUM NIGHT CLUB

126 SW 4TH

FR: Floater—9

SA: Party w/ DJ Hes—9

MO: Karaoke night w/ Patches—9



TOMMY'S PEACOCK

125 SW 2ND ST. 754-8522

FR: Sumo—9

SA: Old Hat—9

WE: Improv blues & jazz jam w/ Neal Grandstaff & Ray Brassfield—8:30