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Activist Alert 4-4-2013

• The second Lane Latin@ Leadership Forum focusing on “Latinos and the Education System” will be from 6 to 8:30 pm Thursday, April 4, at District 4J headquarters, 200 N. Monroe in Eugene. Panelists include Carmen Urbina, Juan Cuadros, Edward M. Olivos, Michael Sámano and Anselmo Villanueva. For more information, email Phil Carrasco at carrasco.philipanthony@gmail.com

• The annual HOPES conference will be April 4-6 at Lawrence Hall at UO. The theme this year is “Collaborative Futures.” HOPES (Holistic Options for Planet Earth Options) is a free ecological design conference developed and managed by students. See a schedule of workshops, speakers and other events at hopes19.wordpress.com

No Coal Eugene will meet at 5 pm Thursday, April 4, at Growers Market, 454 Willamette St., and this week’s meeting will include a potluck at 4:30 pm. See nocoaleugene.org for more information.

Arun Toké of Skipping Stones multicultural magazine for youth, based in Eugene, is leading a free, informal conversation about cultural diversity, climate change, peace and justice, and creative thinking at 3 pm Saturday, April 6, at the downtown Eugene Public Library. Call 682-5450 for more information.

Occupy Eugene and Occupy Bankbusters will present a benefit showing of the documentary The Secret of Oz at 6 pm Monday, April 8, at Cozmic, 8th and Charnelton. The film explains the symbolism hidden in Baum’s children’s story and more. 

• A roundtable on “The Politics of Emergency and Suspicion: The Post-9/11 Arab and Muslim-American Experience” will begin at 2 pm Monday, April 8, at the Knight Library Browsing Room on campus. A keynote address will follow at 4 pm on “Fracturing Our ‘More Perfect Union’: Post-9/11 Discriminatory Profiling and Surveillance,” featuring Hina Shamsi, director of the ACLU’s National Security Project. Roundtable panelists include Lauretta Frederking of PSU, Margaret Hu of Duke University, and Kayse Jama of the Center for Intercultural Organizing. Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics.