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For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has requested that a prescription opioid be removed from the market. 

On June 8, the FDA announced in a press release that for reformulated Opana ER — a time released semi-synthetic opioid — risks outweigh its benefits. 

It’s like something out of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 — firefighters set trees ablaze and fan flames across the grassland. This is the cutting edge in wildfire management and forest ecology: prescribing fires as medicine for sick forests. 

Fire was a political tool in Bradbury’s novel — a means of destroying literature and controlling the population. Today, wildfire and prescribed fire are politicized as well. What once was a force of nature is now beaten back, choked out and stamped by the great paws of Smokey Bear.

Across a lush brook with tumbling miniature waterfalls and past about a quarter mile of trail-less forest there’s a hand painted canvas sign in a large Douglas fir tree that reads: “Logging cancelled due to climate emergency!”

“A ‘gleaner’ is traditionally someone who collects leftover crops after they have been commercially harvested, or on fields where it is not economically profitable to harvest,” says Brandy Collier, president of the local chapter of the Eugene Area Gleaners. 

• The McKenzie River Trust will participate in the statewide Oregon Walk the Land Day event. Visitors can check out Green Island at the confluence of the McKenzie and Willamette rivers 7 am to 5 pm on Saturday, June 24. The property has no address, but for those with a GPS or use Google Maps, the last street address before the property is 31668 Green Island Road. Easy directions to Green Island can be found at bit.ly/1np51uy. Parking on the property is limited, so carpooling is encouraged.

Seneca Jones Timber Company, 541-689-1011, plans to spray 93.4 acres about 1 mile south of Hamm Road and 2 miles west of Territorial Highway with glyphosate, imazapyr & metsulfuron methyl, sulfometuron methyl, triclopyr with acid, triclopyr with amine, triclopyr with choline, triclopyr with ester, Conquer, Crosshair, MSO Concentrate and/or Crop Oil Concentrate. See ODF notification 2017-781-07685, call Brian Peterson at 541-935-2283 with questions.

Compiled by Gary Hale, Forestland Dwellers: 541-342-8332, forestlanddwellers.org

• How many renters get evicted in Lane County each year? The numbers are not easy to come by, but local demographics mapper Joe Kosewic has tracked the landlord cases that end up in court in Oregon and broken down the numbers by county. Evictions that are uncontested far outnumber actual court cases, he figures. Lane County had 1,794 court-contested evictions in 2016. Multnomah County had 5,446, Washington County had 2,952 and Marion County had 1,951. Kosewic says the Residential Eviction Complaint form doesn’t track whether children are involved in the evictions.

• Velvet Edge Boutique, an upscale women’s clothing store at 187 Broadway, is planning to move to Fifth Street Public Market in August, according to owners Marjorie Taylor and her daughter Amber Taylor. Marjorie Taylor has a three-decade academic career in the field of psychology and Amber Taylor has a background in drama.

Accountability and transparency are essential to democracy. As Eugene’s mayor, I invite you to explore with me the potential benefits of a performance auditor to improve the effectiveness of city government and build the community’s trust in our public process.

How tense is it in Salem right now?  The governor just hired a crack team of medical specialists called cranio-proctologists to investigate the alleged legislative leadership. There’s ample evidence that the state Capitol is about to explode. And with less than a few weeks until the July 10 sine die date for adjournment, something needed to be done.

Now based in Brooklyn, songwriter Lucy Marie Horton grew up in Vancouver, Washington. She says she didn’t experience catcalling until she moved back East. 

I don’t trust anyone who doesn’t from time to time like to feel sad — to occasionally pull melancholy over themselves like a warm blanket or, on a warm summer day, bathe in it like a cool, dark room. 

While not as well known as Jay Gatsby or Huckleberry Finn, Mama Rose is one of the defining characters of American literature. At once a hustler, a social climber, a visionary and an imposter, the hard-edged protagonist of the classic 1959 Broadway musical Gypsy would sell not only her soul, but her children’s souls as well, to break the bonds of dull poverty and rise to wealth and stardom, vicarious or otherwise.

MEATY COMMENTARY

It is clear that EW enjoys trolling “sensitive types” — it gets people talking about the newspaper. But I thought opening your article about a food truck with, “Butchering — cutting down an animal for food — is an art, a calling, a passion,” is creepy and demands comment.

The title of Very Little Theatre’s latest mainstage show, Perfect Wedding, is a bit of an oxymoron: There’s no such thing.

What do you want to be when you grow up? It’s a question asked of children, and they know to pick just one thing. Sometimes it works out that way. You decide on a profession or fall into a job, and then stay in it the rest of your life.

I am a 34-year-old straight woman. I’m monogamous and have an avoidant attachment style. I’ve been seeing a guy I really like. He’s just my type, the kind of person I’ve been looking for my whole life. Thing is, he’s in an open relationship with someone he’s been with for most of his adult life. He was sneaky—he didn’t reveal he was in an open relationship until the second date, but by then I was infatuated and felt like I wasn’t in control of my actions.

If you found yourself at dinner with Donald Trump, what would you do? Grit your teeth and get through it, not wanting to upset or inconvenience your hosts? Drink until liquid courage prodded you to say something? Fantasize about taking the future of the world into your hands?

 I visited the state Capitol last week to see the zombies in action. The hallways were empty, even the lobbyists weren’t around. So I did the practical thing and had a beer with my state senator, Floyd Frank Prochoiceski, and former senator Jackie Dingfelder. Floyd described the lack of communication among the members and their respective caucuses. Succinctly speaking, Salem sucks.

On May 30, Lincoln County passed ballot measure 21-177, a measure banning the aerial spraying of pesticides, making it the first county in the nation to do so. A group in Lane County is looking to enact a similar ban.

I’m peering in at a cluster of dusty, nervous sheep in a cattle chute while standing next to sheep farmer Lynne Miller. She just drove four of her lambs down from Corvallis to the Mohawk Valley Meats slaughterhouse outside Springfield.

Summer food means fun, right? Barbeques, picnics, leisurely dinners in the outdoors. But for many in our community — those struggling with food insecurity issues — summer can mean a long spell with little or no support. Fortunately, a network of vital local community programs helps to fill the need. 

Oregon’s four NAACP branch presidents were in Salem Monday, June 12, to announce the release of the organization’s “Oregon Environmental Justice” report and to support several bills before the end of the state’s 2017 regular legislative session. 

It was at Anice Thigpen’s lowest emotional point that the protagonist in her new opera The Woman of Salt came to her. 

“I was walking in the woods. And she took the wind out of the firs and made that the voice for the first song,” she says. 

The Woman of Salt — Thigpen’s first opera — was born from deep trauma.