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Music

Deep Time is a band that cracks sonic earth in a new epoch.  Known for the past six years as Yellow Fever, an infectiously discordant two-piece pop outfit out of Austin

The romance of insanity is as intrinsic to our concept of genius as it is to our love of rock-’n’-roll gold. Combine the two, and you’ve got one serious speedball of flameout.

Dating back to antiquity, musicians and entertainers have taken to the streets seeking fame and fortune through song, dance and tricks.

Half a century since the ‘60s, and modern music continues to rely on the neural framework of psychedelia established during that seminal decade.

The year is eighteen hundred ‘n’ somethin’. Hezekiah Goldfarb is making his way across the Oregon Trail from Tennessee.

This summer finds Oregon’s biggest classical music festival in transition. Oregon Bach Festival founding artistic director Helmuth Rilling retires after next summer’s festival

Eugene singer-songwriter Caroline Bauer is only 21, but the lyrics to her gracefully composed love songs might have you thinking differently.

Oakhurst is a nationally acclaimed bluegrass-ish quintet from Denver, Colo., that’s as versatile as it is original.

Portland’s Lost Lander produced some funny YouTube clips to promote its last Kickstarter campaign. Go watch,  I’ll wait …

Sad Face, the Seattle-based rock band, has a sound that secretes a cavernous misery with narrow undertones of pleasure; a juxtaposition only achievable by masters of music.

The Wainwright Brothers, those beardy bluegrass buskers known for inciting dance frenzies up and down the West Coast, are back at it again.

Punk was designed to exude grease. Oily, filthy, sweaty grease at the perimeter of safety-pin piercing-holes and studded denim vests.

All Nicki Bluhm wants to do is have some fun, and she’s got a feeling she’s not the only one.

Jazz venues have come and gone over the years in Eugene, but we now seem to be enjoying a downtown jazz resurgence.

If Eugene had a soundtrack, it would, without a doubt, include a song or two from the up-and-coming band Blue Lotus. 

If you prefer your shirts plaid, your music twangy and your whiskey from a Mason jar, you’re probably going to like what’s going down at Sam Bond’s Friday.

Tara Stonecipher & The Tall Grass isn’t a band with lighthearted content.

There’s an art to making elegies and sorrow-ridden songs appealing. Jeff Tweedy and Elliott Smith both come to mind.

If you’ve ever wondered what would’ve happened to Sublime had lead singer Bradley Nowell survived his deadly dance with heroin, I have the answer.

Phoenix, Ariz., is the sere severity of the suburban Southwest, the immediate instigator of Stephen Steinbrink’s songs.

When you toss Bradley Wik and the Charlatans’ debut album Burn What you Can, Bury the Rest into a computer, the machine will categorize it as pop music. Machines lie.

OUT/LOUD is the biggest women’s queer music festival in the Northwest and it’s happening right here in downtown Eugene in Kesey Square.

The Oregon Bach Festival doesn’t start till the end of June, but if you just can’t wait to get that summer Baroque fix there are a couple of enticing early music concerts this weekend.

I feel old. Young bands are listing “mid-aughts indie” as their influences — groups like Pavement, Guided By Voices, etc.