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News Briefs

In July, federal agency Wildlife Services set a bear trap at Lane County Waste Management’s Rattlesnake Road facility without consulting Patti Hansen, manager of the facility. Hansen says that the bear trap was set while she was on vacation and that she had the trap removed before any bears were trapped and killed. 

Private citizens, members of Cottage Grove’s Forest Web and former Lane County commissioner Jerry Rust are concerned the decisions about Oregon’s public forests, and specifically the O&C forests that have been used to generate cash for counties, are being made in secret. Rust and Cristina Hubbard of Forest Web held a press conference and delivered letters to Gov. Kitzhaber’s office on Dec. 18 asking him to open his O&C “timber panel” up for citizen participation. 

On the evening of Nov. 23, a 17-year-old African-American girl was beaten and left for dead near the Springfield Fred Meyer. Now family members say they need the public’s help to catch the perpetrator.

“Some people have a mentality of not wanting to talk to the police, but this is somebody’s life,” says Jeremiah Farish, the girl’s brother. “She could have died — if the lady didn’t find her, she could have died.” He urges anyone with knowledge of the attack to call the Springfield Police Department Tip Line at 726-3721.

Nine more local facilities’ industrial stormwater pollution control plans are up for public comment this week. These plans are for facilities that have applied for Clean Water Act permit coverage under the new industrial stormwater permit issued by Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), and that took effect July 1. Comments are due by 5 pm on Jan. 3.

Frequent travelers on Willamette Street between 24th and 32nd avenues know that the corridor isn’t Eugene’s finest for travel, and with the November passage of the pavement preservation bond measure, there’s funding to repave and possibly reconfigure the stretch in the next five years.

Congressman Peter DeFazio, whose own hometown of Springfield made national headlines in 1998 with the deadly Thurston High School shootings, says this week that Congress “will need to address a number of critical issues next year and this [mass shootings] should be a top priority.”

A former county attorney has filed an intent to sue Lane County for wrongful termination, retaliation for the exercise of First Amendment rights for speaking out on matters of public concern and for whistleblowing. A tort claim notice letter that was hand-delivered to County Counsel (and District Attorney) Alex Gardner Oct. 29 says that Marc Kardell was fired after he raised concerns about misuse of county funds and the actions of County Administrator Liane Richardson that were causing “a multitude of problems” within the county.

Smile: You’re on camera all over Eugene these days. Do a Google search for “Eugene webcam” and you’ll find cameras filming public spaces from the UO to the Owen Rose Garden. A recent revelation that Lane Transit District (LTD) had looked into not just videoing but also audio recording individual conversations on Eugene-area buses has local defenders of civil liberties concerned. 

Sometimes a camping ban is more than a camping ban, according to Eugene homeless rights activists with Safe Legally Entitled Emergency Places to Sleep (SLEEPS).

Eugene’s municipal code prohibits the use of sleeping bags, bedding, tents, stoves and fires on public property, and SLEEPS says such prohibitions put a barrier between the homeless and staying alive.  

When the Supreme Court announced Dec. 7 that it would hear challenges to the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and California’s Proposition 8 in the spring, gay rights advocates across the country rejoiced. Savage Love columnist Dan Savage, who just got married in Washington, would probably enjoy seeing his Oregon friends get wed as well. But rulings favorable to marriage equality won’t immediately affect Oregonians; a 2006 amendment to Oregon’s Constitution defines marriage as between one man and one woman.

Everyone should have a place to spend the holiday season, and an initiative from Mayor Kitty Piercy is going to try to make that happen. In an attempt to help the homeless, Piercy has the goal of raising $40,000 to assist 40 families in need. The program, called “A Home for the Holidays,” will strive to give these 40 families housing. St. Vincent de Paul of Lane County has joined forces with Piercy in an effort to accomplish this feat, and Oregon Community Credit Union has already come up with $20,000 toward the goal. 

Worse than coal in your Christmas stocking is coal in your water. A recent accident at a coal terminal in Vancouver, B.C., calls attention to the impacts that coal exports have on oceans and waterways around the ports. A large bulk carrier of coal collided with one of the coal trestles at the Westshore Terminals port in Canada on Dec. 7, spilling several tons of coal into the ocean. This is in addition to a coal carrier that ran aground in November, and another that recently docked with a large crack in its hull. 

Winter is coming. But Eugene’s Opportunity Village, a housing for the homeless pilot project now slated for a site near North Garfield Street and Roosevelt in the Whiteaker, won’t be up and running for at least four to six months. That’s why Safe Legally Entitled Emergency Places to Sleep (SLEEPS) representatives are urging the City Council to repeal Eugene’s camping ban through the winter and designate specific camping areas. 

More than four months after the Occupy Housing and Foreclosure Action Committee (OH-FAC) moved into the foreclosed home on the corner of 12th and Lawrence, it’s being reoccupied by its owner. Occupiers say owner Karen Atkinson, who left the home two years ago, is in a sort of “legal limbo,” but she’s challenging the foreclosure.

Lief O’Neill, a 9-year-old Monroe boy who is severely autistic but also highly communicative, came within hours of dying in late November after being denied a heart transplant in Oregon due to his disability. But doctors at Stanford’s Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital heard of his plight and agreed to do a surgical procedure that will hopefully keep him alive until a suitable heart can be found. He was flown from Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland to Palo Alto and had the surgery Dec. 4. 

Seven more local facility’s industrial stormwater pollution control plans for are up for public comment this week. These plans are for facilities that have applied for Clean Water Act permit coverage under the new industrial stormwater permit issued by Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), and that took effect July 1. Comments are due by 5 PM on Dec.

Farmers and parents in the Highway 36/Triangle Lake area west of Eugene have been fighting for years to put an end to toxic aerial sprays of pesticides by private timber companies that drift onto nearby homes and gardens. After residents, including children, in the Triangle Lake area tested positive for the chemicals atrazine and 2,4-D in their urine, the Oregon Health Authority and other agencies begin to investigate the drifting pesticide issue.

What if you could peel off Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel fresco from the Vatican, roll it up, send it on a plane and put it on display here in Eugene?  That’s on the same scale of what UO Associate Professor James Harper is trying to do, except with some of the most famous tapestries in the world, the Barberini Tapestries, commissioned by Roman 17th-century nobility and contemporaries of the Medicis, the Barberini family.

Twenty-five years have passed since Alito Alessi and his dance partner Karen Nelson pioneered DanceAbility (DA), an internationally-renowned dance method that employs movement to explore artistic expression between people with and without disabilities, and Dec. 7 marks the beginning of their week-long anniversary celebration with a free First Friday ArtWalk event, 6:30 pm at the Broadway Commerce Center including performances by disabled and able-bodied dancers. The goal of DA is to challenge misconceptions and prejudices that people have about themselves and others.

Some of Oregon’s sharpest storytellers will share memories of off-beat holiday mischief and wintry discontent at the annual Planned Parenthood Advocates holiday benefit from 8:30 to 10:30 pm Friday, Dec. 7, at Cozmic, 199 W. 8th Ave. Tickets are $15 at the door or $13 in advance from CozmicPizza.com and at the Cozmic box office.

Long have dogs, cats and chickens been allowed as pets in urban areas, but now Genie Harden is making an effort to give them company here in the form of miniature Nigerian dwarf goats. Harden, who has a farm on Chezem Road in Eugene, is running a goat school on her property this weekend to teach those interested in owning goats how to raise them.

The Lane County Jail has been releasing prisoners due to lack of space — including one who walked down the street and promptly robbed a bank — and public safety has been on the Board of County Commissioners’ agendas lately, but it’s not clear if the county is any closer to a safety solution. Sid Leiken, board chair and part of the commission’s conservative majority, sent a message this week indicating the board may be backing away from a jail tax and instead blaming budget woes on a lack of logging on public lands. 

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is accepting public comments this week on industrial stormwater pollution control plans for more local facilities that have applied for Clean Water Act (CWA) permit coverage under the new industrial stormwater permit. Comments are due by 5 pm on Dec. 13, and the facilities are: All American Fabricating, Emerald Forest Products, Forrest Paint Co., Gheen Irrigation Works, Gibson Steel Fabricating, Hearthside Food Solutions and Valley Landfills, (Benton County).

Drink some local beer, meet local food people and talk controversial canola this weekend at Cozmic as part of a regular InFARMation (farm + information = InFARMation) series the first Sunday of the month from now through April 7, 2013. The series is part of an effort to bring eaters together with farmers to make the food web stronger and create real change in the local food system, according to Friends of Family Farmers, which has been hosting monthly InFARMation get-togethers in Portland.