• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

Movies

June 21, 2012 12:00 AM

Director Bruce McDonald’s documentary Music from the Big House follows Canadian blues vocalist Rita Chiarelli as she journeys into the Louisiana State Penitentiary.

In 1968, Johnny Cash played Folsom State Prison, in what would become the definitive live performance of his career. It’s a show that will never be forgotten. This wasn’t, however, the first prison-bound performance to make history, and it certainly wasn’t the last.

June 14, 2012 12:00 AM

There’s simply too much circumstantial evidence to ignore the truth another minute: Tony Scott and Ridley Scott are the same exact person.

I’ve been told Tony Scott, the shameless pimp responsible for such box-office bait jobs as Top Gun and Beverly Hills Cop 2, is the younger brother of Oscar-nominated director Ridley Scott, but I’m not so sure. Where’s the proof? I want to see a birth certificate. Because, just having sat through Prometheus, I’ve come to the conclusion that Hollywood has hatched the boldest conspiracy since they sealed Uncle Walt’s nuts in a Mason jar of formaldehyde.

June 7, 2012 12:00 AM

If it’s true that nationalism and immigration are the most dangerous issues confronting the planet in this early 21st century, it’s reasonable to suggest that, at the spiritual level, our soul’s greatest peril now lies in the tension between belief and nothingness.

If it’s true that nationalism and immigration are the most dangerous issues confronting the planet in this early 21st century, it’s reasonable to suggest that, at the spiritual level, our soul’s greatest peril now lies in the tension between belief and nothingness — a crisis of faith that finds the New Age con pitted against the death of God, where our need to believe is crucified by our suspicion that all our myths are shattered lies. It’s the curse of the Enlightenment.

June 7, 2012 12:00 AM

When a movie poster trumpets not the film’s stars but that it’s “From the producers of Alice in Wonderland,” we should see that as a bright and telling signpost.

When a movie poster trumpets not the film’s stars but that it’s “From the producers of Alice in Wonderland,” we should see that as a bright and telling signpost: The film to come will be full of brief flashes and thin shadows, hollowness and pretty costumes, a mass-produced print hung in an antique frame. 

May 31, 2012 12:00 AM

Chris Thile, the obsessive genius behind prog-bluegrass pioneers Punch Brothers, first picked up the mandolin at age 5, and is now hailed by many as the finest player in the world.

Chris Thile, the obsessive genius behind prog-bluegrass pioneers Punch Brothers, first picked up the mandolin at age 5, and is now hailed by many as the finest player in the world. In Mark Meatto’s new documentary, How to Grow a Band, there is scarcely any footage of Thile without his instrument; he’s always off in the corner, perfecting some lickety-split chromatic run. At one point in the film, Punch Brother banjoist Noam Pikelny recalls a family legend about his colleague’s daunting dedication.

May 24, 2012 12:00 AM

First Position is an unfussy, enjoyable documentary that doesn’t pretend to be anything other than what it is: an inspirational sports movie about young dancers.

First Position is an unfussy, enjoyable documentary that doesn’t pretend to be anything other than what it is: an inspirational sports movie about young dancers hoping to enter the highly competitive world of professional ballet.

May 17, 2012 12:00 AM

Nothing could be simpler, more pat and shrink-wrapped, than the plot of The Raid: Redemption.

Nothing could be simpler, more pat and shrink-wrapped, than the plot of The Raid: Redemption, a new Indonesian beatdown flick by writer/director Gareth Evans. Like a plain wire hanger holding up a Dior cocktail dress, Evans’ screenplay pitches just enough narrative ballast to support this breakneck epic of cops and bad guys indulging in an orgy of wham-bam gunplay and jittery fisticuffs (and karate chops, eye gouges, head butts, pile drivers, evisceration, vivisection and defenestration).

May 10, 2012 12:00 AM

It’s possible that Joss Whedon’s true calling in life is to write dialogue for Robert Downey Jr.’s Tony Stark.

It’s possible that Joss Whedon’s true calling in life is to write dialogue for Robert Downey Jr.’s Tony Stark. Or maybe RDJ was born to speak Whedon’s quippy, pop-culture-laced dialogue, which sounds as natural coming from Downey’s mouth as it did from Sarah Michelle Gellar’s when she played Whedon’s best-known creation, vampire slayer Buffy Summers.

May 2, 2012 11:00 PM

Kevin, the sullen-faced first child of wealthy parents, is a piece of work. As a baby, he screams so fiercely that his mother finds a jackhammer soothing.

Kevin, the sullen-faced first child of wealthy parents, is a piece of work. As a baby, he screams so fiercely that his mother finds a jackhammer soothing; as a toddler, he’s resistant to everything; as a teen, he’s destructive and aggressively surly. There’s nothing redeeming about the kid, but his father, Franklin (John C. Reilly), sees nothing wrong. It’s just how boys are, right? 

April 25, 2012 11:00 PM

As an archetypal resident of L.A.’s shadier streets, the Dude abides, a latter-day California Buddha in the Holy Temple of Slackerdom, plum mystic and stoned immaculate, a knocker of pins, drinker of Caucasians. “He’s the man for his time and place,” says the man in the cowboy hat, his purple baritone of a voice rumbling like warm milk in your stomach.

April 18, 2012 11:00 PM

Academic satire breathes a fairly rarified air, typically isolated to dodgy second novels or the untenured ravings of drunk grad students.

Academic satire breathes a fairly rarified air, typically isolated to dodgy second novels or the untenured ravings of drunk grad students. It seems diminishing, then, to classify director Joseph Cedar’s brilliant new movie, Footnote, as merely a jab at the pretensions of ivory tower intellectuals. Though this nearly perfect film does pick, hilariously, at the itchy nit of alienated highbrows — revealing how the fortress of academia also doubles as emotional hideout — it becomes in the end something more profound than the infinitesimal parody implied by its title.

April 18, 2012 11:00 PM

Once upon a time, there was a blonde girl in an alley, and she looked like easy prey for a hungry vampire. But that girl’s name was Buffy, and the vampire was totally wrong

Once upon a time, there was a blonde girl in an alley, and she looked like easy prey for a hungry vampire. But that girl’s name was Buffy, and the vampire was totally wrong

Once upon a time, and another time, and another time before that, there was a group of kids, and when they thought they were going to have a nice weekend in a cabin in the woods, they were totally wrong

April 11, 2012 11:00 PM
#MUTLIPLE#

HIS/HERS The POV from a P and V

Crazy Horse, opens Friday, April 13, at Bijou Cinemas

 

April 5, 2012 12:00 AM

Director Antony Cordier’s Four Lovers is a film that travels far beyond the borders of most comfort zones.

Director Antony Cordier’s Four Lovers is a film that travels far beyond the borders of most comfort zones. When Rachel (Marina Foïs) brings home new friends Vincent (Nicolas Duvauchelle) and his wife Teri (Élodie Bouchez) to have dinner with her and husband Franck (Roschdy Zem), there is distinct chemistry among the four. 

April 5, 2012 12:00 AM

Are we currently hung up on fairy tales, or is it just Snow White?

Are we currently hung up on fairy tales, or is it just Snow White? Once Upon a Time and Grimm carry the fairy-tale banner on television; on the big screen, Mirror Mirror  beats the upcoming Snow White and the Huntsman to the punch. Fairy tale retellings abound in novels and comics, plenty of them featuring the girl with white skin, red lips and ebony tresses.

March 29, 2012 12:00 AM

The Oscar-nominated Polish film In Darkness truly resides in darkness. There is the dank, flickering dimness of the sewer system where a small group of Polish Jews hides after their ghetto is murderously hollowed out by Nazis; there’s the looming shadow cast by the city worker upon whom this starving, hunted group is forced to place its tenuous trust; and overwhelming everything is the black hole of the Holocaust, extinguishing every glimmer of human hope.

March 29, 2012 12:00 AM

The Hunger Games is a solid piece of entertainment about kids being forced to kill other kids for the amusement of a corrupt elite.

THE HUNGER GAMES:  Directed by Gary Ross. Screenplay by Gary Ross, Billy Ray and Suzanne Collins, based on Collins’ novel. Cinematography, Tom Stern. Editors, Christopher S. Capp, Stephen Mirrione, Juliette Welfling. Music, James Newton Howard. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Lenny Kravitz and Elizabeth Banks. Lionsgate, 2012. PG-13. 142 minutes.Three and a half stars.
March 22, 2012 12:00 AM

The way I see it, there are four types of movies: those good, those enjoyably bad, those so bad they are no longer enjoyable, and those so much worse than that they become enjoyable again. 

 THE ROOM: Written and Directed by Tommy Wiseau. Starring Tommy Wiseau, Greg Sestero, Juliette Danielle. Wiseau Films, 2003. R. 99 minutes. Five Stars.
March 15, 2012 12:00 AM

John Carter didn’t show up without baggage. That’s a nice way to say that for months, people have been talking more about the story (and money) around the movie than about the movie itself.

John Carter didn’t show up without baggage. That’s a nice way to say that for months, people have been talking more about the story (and money) around the movie than about the movie itself — a tactic that sometimes works out just fine (hello, Titantic) and sometimes doesn’t. When The New York Times is making Ishtar references while Monday-morning quarterbacking a film’s weekend take, it’s relatively safe to assume the pre-release gossip hits home.

March 8, 2012 12:00 AM

Very likely not coming any time soon, if ever, to a theater near you is a locally produced work-in-progress of guerilla moviemaking that might just qualify as the biggest farce and most extravagantly produced anti-event.

Very likely not coming any time soon, if ever, to a theater near you is a locally produced work-in-progress of guerilla moviemaking that might just qualify as the biggest farce and most extravagantly produced anti-event since Geraldo Rivera cracked open Al Capone’s vault to a big fart of dust.

March 8, 2012 12:00 AM

The first time I saw it, I tuned into the middle, on late night TV. A scene at the derelict mansion, Norma with her stilted grandiose expressions, the melancholy, ominous butler and William Holden, the straight man.

The first time I saw it, I tuned into the middle, on late night TV. A scene at the derelict mansion, Norma with her stilted grandiose expressions, the melancholy, ominous butler and William Holden, the straight man. It was surreal, came off like Abbot and Costello Meet Dracula, without Abbot and Costello. I was hooked. I got the title, turned it off and rented it the next day.

March 8, 2012 12:00 AM

George Clinton describes their music as “too black for white people, to white for black people,” and Circle Jerk singer Keith Morris says of their status, “If there’s twelve levels, they’re on the thirteenth level.”

George Clinton describes their music as “too black for white people, to white for black people,” and Circle Jerk singer Keith Morris says of their status, “If there’s twelve levels, they’re on the thirteenth level.”

February 23, 2012 12:00 AM

The end of the world has been depicted — repeatedly — in movies before. But 2011 wasn’t a time for grand heroics, for world saving and self-sacrifice. Instead, we got existential angst. Maybe that sounds a little grim, and sometimes it was.

“It’s the end of the world. Everyone dies. 
It’s rather important, really.” 
— Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s librarian, Rupert Giles

February 16, 2012 12:00 AM

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front cuts from dramatic media footage, including the burning of a $12-million ski resort at Vail, Colo., and the arson at the University of Washington Center for Urban Horticulture, to the streets of New York City, where activist and ecosaboteur Daniel McGowan was living in 2005.

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front cuts from dramatic media footage, including the burning of a $12-million ski resort at Vail, Colo., and the arson at the University of Washington Center for Urban Horticulture, to the streets of New York City, where activist and ecosaboteur Daniel McGowan was living in 2005.