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Choreographer David Parsons’ signature piece, Caught (1982), features more than 100 leaps in six minutes by a solo dancer who is repeatedly trapped in mid-motion by the strobe lights he controls, creating an illusion of flight. Seen live, the work is unforgettable; I saw it once here, in Eugene, at the Hult Center, danced by Parsons himself.

Caught seems an apt metaphor for dance: vital, powerful yet ephemeral, almost fragile. Dance requires a nutritive base to thrive, constant support and a collaborative spirit. Any dance venture is a leap of faith.

Seneca Jones Timber (541-689-1011) has notified on multiple units in Lane and Douglas counties. Avel Salgado of Oregon Forest Management Services, Springfield, (541-520-5941) will spot spray two units near Weiss Road just south of Hamm Road: 4.4 acres and 74.7 acres. Poison mixture is triclopyr with acid, amine, choline and ester, and additives Conquer, Hi-Light Blue and MSO Concentrate. Start date Sept. 9. Seneca forester is Ted Reiss (541-607-7299). Oregon Department of Forestry forester is Jay Morey in Roseburg (541-440-3412). Notification # 2016-730-10319.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) sent Chicago-based MHC NAC (formerly National American Corporation) a warning letter on Aug. 22 for monitoring and sampling violations of its sewage permit for South Jetty RV & Campground, located on South Jetty Road in Florence. The violations date to 2011, and some of them appear to have occurred every year from 2011 through 2015. DEQ “is concerned that additional permit violations may continue to occur in the future.” DEQ also sent Hull-Oakes Lumber a warning letter on Aug.

• We’ll bend a knee with Colin Kaepernick, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback stirring up the conservative sports world with his visual statement against racism in America. He’s kneeling, not standing for the “Star Spangled Banner” and taking frightening flak for it. Bravo to his coach Chip Kelly, well known to Eugeneans, who affirmed free speech in America, as did President Obama and some other sports stars like Megan Rapinoe, the great soccer player. Makes no sense, but we were pleased to see the 49ers win last Thursday.

• Now Ducks don’t have to go far to get their ice cream fix: Red Wagon Creamery launched its new shop at the University of Oregon’s revamped Erb Memorial Union on Sept. 6. The newly remodeled EMU officially reopens on Oct. 6.  

• Ward 1 Eugene City Council candidate Josh Skov is having a campaign kickoff at The Barn Light, 924 Willamette Street, 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Thursday, Sept. 8. Skov’s campaign says, “This will be an opportunity for voters to learn more about how Skov will fight for our community, and to learn how supporters can get involved.” All welcome, but space is limited, so the campaign is asking for attendees to RSVP at joshuaskov.com/fall_kick_off or on Facebook. Skov faces Emily Semple in the November election for the City Council seat.

I wanted to be white for three weeks in 4th grade (1965)because I was being rejected, being the only black kid in class in my elementary school in Bel Air. After three weeks I realized, wait, there’s nothing wrong with me, it’s them. 

My home training countered the non-lessons I was getting: Slaves were smart. Slaves resisted every step of the way. We were the slaves that taught ourselves to read, when it was a death sentence. 

August went by in flash, as usual. Daily watering chores. Jam making. An ocean of applesauce.

After a week’s vacation in a cabin by the Metolius, I somehow carved out time to think about the fall and winter vegetable garden. Space must be carved out, too, and I’m grateful for any crops that can go in after the pole beans and tomatoes are torn out in October.

Before Elton John, Duncan Sheik and Green Day created original stage scores, before all those jukebox musicals featuring songs by Abba, Four Seasons, Carole King and more, even before Rent, Grease, Hair and Jesus Christ Superstar, there was Lionel Bart — a pop songwriter who never learned to read or write music and yet composed some of Britain’s biggest pop hits of the 1950s for Cliff Richard and other stars.

Jerry Joseph has been called the Anthony Bourdain of music.

“I finally realized I was never going to be a big fucking rock star,” Joseph says. “Nobody’s ever going to invite me to Saigon to come play a concert.” 

It might be the way Makayla Meador carries her contagious energy or the fact she’s taking the local DJ scene by storm — whatever it is, something tells me to remember her name. 

Meador, whose DJ alias is Evergreen, describes her sound as “future bass” and says she finds inspiration in the everyday eclectic sounds of water droplets, cans being cracked open or ping pong balls. She has been performing and producing electronica since the summer of 2015, and has already opened up for big names like The Floozies and worked alongside G-Eazy — pretty impressive, considering she doesn’t even have an EP out yet. 

PLEASE IGNORE MY PRIVATE $2 BILLION FOUNDATION

On Aug. 21 The New York Times reported the Clinton Foundation has raised about $2 billion since 1997.

 Apparently “truth” bends in the direction of money, a shiny pot of gold that just happens to have the Clinton Foundation address at rainbow’s end.

Most Americans are not convinced this “amazing coincidence” isn’t a conflict of interest.

Half a century ago this world, as well as worlds beyond our solar system, fell in love with the ’60s television series-turned-movie franchise known as Star Trek.

Christina Allaback, creative director of Eugene’s Trek Theatre, says that along with the relationships among central characters like Kirk, Spock and McCoy, the show’s underlying message of hope helps Star Trek endure.

My husband left the picture recently, and I’m now a single mom supporting an infant in Toronto. I work a retail job and am drowning financially. I hooked up with a guy I met on Tinder, and I didn’t warn him that I’m still nursing because I didn’t even think of it. Luckily, he really got off on it—so I was spared the awkwardness of “Eww, what is coming out of your tits?!” Afterward, he joked about there being a market for lactating women in the kink world. My questions: If I find someone who will pay me to suckle my milk, is that prostitution?

As the riotous ’60s bled into the scabby ’70s, a lot of people in this country found themselves asking what happened to the American Dream, and movies from that era reflected this swooning miasma. In film after great film, directors like Martin Scorsese, Sam Peckinpah and Robert Altman, to name just a few, tapped into our growing sense that something had gone seriously, desperately wrong — that the great social experiment of democracy and prosperity had finally begun rotting from the inside out.

I spent a half hour of my life watching YouTube videos of nearly naked men wiggling and worming around on stages illuminated by flashy lights — for research purposes, of course. Magic Men Live is coming to town and there’s something hypnotic about the performers’ abdominal capabilities.  

Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson is, for some Lane County voters, a possible alternative to Bernie Sanders. But while Johnson told EW during a recent phone call that he believes climate change is man-made, he also believes a free market economy is part of the fix.

Do you remember what your favorite color was when you were a kid? Winter Peterson remembers hers: multicolor.

“I saw that on a container of glitter when I was a kid and thought it was one color,” she says. “But no – it was all colors.”

Since then, her worldview hasn’t gotten any less colorful. Peterson calls herself a “recreational, loud, gaudy person,” and she can often be seen around Eugene in drag or even a clown costume. “People don’t expect to see clowns out at the bars,” she says.

Sniffing out what you shouldn't miss in the arts this week

Some Bernie Sanders supporters wept as they watched Hillary Clinton snag her party’s nomination at the Democratic National Convention this summer. Months of hard grassroots toil erased. Millions of dreams squashed.

Many diehard Berners balk at the notion of another Clinton presidency. And of course Trump is a non-starter. The quadrennial scrum for the Oval Office has devolved into a dog and pony show of oligarchic proportions.

The Lane County Board of Commissioners voted 5-0 on Aug. 30 to call a six-month halt on its efforts to change its initiative petition process, Commissioner Pete Sorenson tells EW

The initiative petition process allows the public to collect signatures and get measures on the ballots, such as efforts to ban aerial sprays of pesticides or genetically modified crops — two issues that local group Community Rights Lane County has been working on.

September is the month that hikers in western Oregon look forward to more than any month. Rainless days are almost guaranteed, mosquito levels drop off quickly and tourists thin out after Labor Day. This year there are a few qualifications to what is typically our best month for backpacking. Mosquito levels may be slow to disappear in the high country because there haven’t been enough freezing nights.

So often we accept the history served to us. We hold collective truths about our past to be self-evident: Jane Roe and her legal team were brave, honorable women fighting for reproductive rights. Vietnam was a worthless war the U.S. never should have been involved in. Classic theater works are important, but generally not very fun. 

Presently, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival is in the business of shaking up our assumptions. The current lineup of 10 plays at OSF offers a cacophony of history and legend alongside classics reinterpreted for a modern audience. The season is smart, entertaining and worth the three-hour trek to Ashland.

Students from the Academy of Arts and Academics (A3), a public high school in Springfield, will head to Nepal in October to volunteer, hike the first stages of the Everest Trek and visit the U.S. Embassy.

Mike Fisher, the school’s director and a former volunteer with the Peace Corps, and Ed Mendelssohn, the school’s managing director, say they started planning the trip last winter after a visit to the Tacoma School of the Arts.