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Weyerhaeuser Company, 746-2511, plans to aerially apply urea fertilizer to 684.1 acres south of Vida and the McKenzie River near West Fork Deer Creek and tributaries and to East Fork Deer Creek tributaries. See ODF notification 2016-771-11891, call Brian Dally at 541-726-3588 with questions.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) fined Dorena Hydro $11,400 Sept. 26 for various Clean Water Act violations associated with reduced dissolved oxygen levels in the Row River caused by the operation of Dorena Dam Hydroelectric Project. The violations occurred in April, when the Row River is designated as an active salmon and steelhead spawning area.

• The David Minor Theater celebrates its 8th anniversary with a special viewing event “Beer and Beyond” 6:45 pm and 9:15 pm Saturday, Oct 22. The theater says, “An evening of celebrations including discounted movie tickets and a special back-to-back screening of the new Star Trek Beyond epic are planned.” Tickets are $4. For more info, go to davidminortheater.com.

• How do we keep public spaces like the Park Blocks and Kesey Square active, vital places where everyone wants to be any day of the year? The city of Eugene has started a Places for People project, in partnership with Project for Public Spaces, and will be asking the community for input at upcoming events and workshops in October. Events include: “Transforming Public Spaces: Talk and Open House with Fred Kent,” 7:30 pm Thursday, Oct. 13, at the LCC Downtown Campus. At 10 am Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Atrium Lobby, 99 W.

In January 2013, I was roofied and raped at a fraternity while I was a student at the University of Oregon. The Sunday before the first day of my last winter term at the UO, I woke up naked with a man I had never wanted to be naked with, the night flooding back to me as I tried to find my clothes and leave. 

Sooner or later it happens. You write or say something and then you have to come clean and admit that you just got it wrong. In “The $7 million giveaway” I argued that our local officials got little or nothing in return for extending the enterprise zone benefits for Broadcom an additional two years.

Though he was born in Eugene, Charles Denson moved to Silver City, Nevada, with his parents when he was 6. “We came back to visit family in the summer and for weddings,” he says. “I moved back in 2006 after high school and got started at Lane Community College.” He began to volunteer with campus groups addressing environmental and social justice issues, and he traveled to Copenhagen in 2009 with a group of young people to lobby U.S. delegates to the United Nations negotiations on climate change.

Two things happen in Oregon in even-numbered years. We hold a general election, and invasive alien biennial weed species (Lawnsignicus obnoxicus) appear in the Willamette Valley. These weeds first blossomed near Creswell on a local site known as Idiot Hill, for some reason. Suddenly there they were, crowded into their limited ecological niche, a dairy farm. They apparently thrive in cow poop. Four signs of the time: Trump/Pierce/Robinson/Richardson all held up by the same wooden stakes. Birds of a feather flock together.

There’s a ghost-like quality to Marissa Nadler’s 2016 release Bury Your Name that’s perfect for fall and winter in Eugene. Throughout the record, the strings of her acoustic guitar are like brittle icicles while the sound of violins envelops the music like breath on a cold morning. And Nadler’s murmuring voice, trapped in an echo box, quivers and quakes. 

Mainstream music has fallen prey to a habit of being short, sweet and shallow. Nahko and Medicine for the People, the multi-cultural music collective that always makes time for Eugene, slows things down with elaborate melodies, lengthy songs and lyrics that dig into an emotional narrative of life’s shitty times.

A great jazz keyboard-and-drum duo arrives at Sam Bond’s Garage Oct. 13: Matt Chamberlain is well known for drumming with jazz stars like Bill Frisell, Herbie Hancock and Brad Mehldau, along with pop singers like David Bowie, Fiona Apple and Morrissey. He and keyboardist Brian Haas, who leads the groovy Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, deliver strutting 21st-century jazz-funk on their new album Prometheus Risen.

DEAD MURAL 

A big wag of my finger to the stodgy business owners of South Eugene who killed Rachel Mandala’s gorgeous mural outside of Amazon Organics on Friday, Oct. 7. 

To EW readers who didn’t have the pleasure, this (now lost) piece depicted a powerful woman with flowing blue hair against a backdrop of orange flowers and an eclipsed moon. During the work’s six weeks of life in my neighborhood, people continually stopped to marvel at its originality and to take pictures. 

Although I’m aware that conflicts of one kind or another have rocked Ireland for centuries, my knowledge of early 20th-century Irish history is admittedly, and perhaps regrettably, patchy, and I’m going to go ahead and wager that, in 2016, it is for most people.

If you could peer into this critic’s embryonic soul, I suspect you’d find A Chorus Line lyrics. 

I wore grooves into my album of the original cast recording as a kid, and heck, my supercool local public elementary school put it on as a fabulous bootleg production, minus the racier numbers, when I was in second grade. Over the years, I’ve probably seen it 25 times, from multiple national tours to Broadway. 

I’m 64 years young, a musician, chubby, full head of hair, no Viagra needed, no alcohol, I don’t mind if you drink, smoker, yes I am. I am also faithful, loyal, and single for five years. No health issues, nada, zero, zilch. Not gay, not prejudiced against gays, pro-woman, Democrat, MASCULINE. Except I only like the younger women and women without tattoos. And I like them FEMININE. Ladies my age are a shopping bag of issues with children and ex-hubbies. NO THANK YOU. So what’s my problem? Young women see me as an old gizzard. I am not ugly, and I look younger than 64.

Reviews of The Birth of a Nation, Hell or High Water, Girl Asleep & Eight Days a Week

Alexandra Bonds’ retrospective costume fashion show this weekend, Portfolio, promises a lively look back at nearly four decades of stitching, with 40 garments leaping from literature to the runway each night.  

• We left the 4th district candidate forum sponsored by the City Club of Eugene Oct. 7 hoping that Congressman Peter DeFazio lives a very long time with the “energy and determination for the job” he says he still has. Republican Art Robinson, positively Trumpian in his attack, is running against Pete for the fourth time and promises to continue, lest any moderate R would like to run.

“La Source” is part of a series of paintings Wiley did called The World Stage: Haiti — the New York-based artist has also done World Stage series in Sri Lanka, Jamaica, Brazil, Lagos and Dakar, France, China and Israel.

In the United States we are taught at a young age to desire impractical shiny things under the premise that more luxury equals a life lived successfully.  

But if our desire for an upper-class aesthetic is a social construct, what part of the goods we consume is real?

Artist Anya Kivarkis ponders this question of the space between consumption and reality by recreating jewelry as sculpture. Since completing her M.F.A. in 2004 at the State University of New York (SUNY), Kivarkis — who is head of the University of Oregon’s jewelry and metalsmithing program in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts — has been cranking out more elaborate pieces in ever larger shows. 

Eugene has an artistic reputation. At least, that’s what Aunia Kahn found when she was researching where to relocate her St. Louis gallery. Kahn had always wanted to live on the West Coast, she says, and after months of research she decided Eugene would be the rightful home of the Alexi Era Gallery.

“After being in the Midwest for an extended period of time, I felt that there was no way to expand myself without being in a little bit more of a progressive area,” Kahn says. “Eugene was an area that wasn’t overpopulated, it wasn’t oversaturated and it’s up-and-coming, and it seemed very loving and accepting. That’s why I chose Eugene.” 

The equinox passing is reflected in shorter days. The rate of change itself changes. Change in day length is fastest at equinox and slowest at solstice. The day-to-day change at equinox is about 3 minutes a day but only 30 seconds a day at winter solstice.

At the end of September, seeds of incense cedar were scattered to the winds and now their cones are raining down. The cones of incense cedar decompose over winter and are gone by spring. 

Standing on the sidewalk, you look up in the sky and see a curious crosshatching of straight white streaks. These are airplane contrails — clouds formed when water vapor condenses and freezes around small particles that exist in aircraft exhaust, according to NASA.

Artist DeeDee Cheriel tells me a story about giving up cigarettes.

“I was incredibly grumpy, just more like an animal than a human,” Cheriel says. 

Around this time she recalls watching Grizzly Man, the 2005 Werner Herzog documentary about a man who tried to live with bears and, well, let’s just say the bears won. 

“I was very moved and touched by that story, but at the same time I had just quit smoking,” she says. “I just repeatedly painted this bear over and over again; it was a representation of me at the moment.”