• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

Articles

DON’T PUNISH LIBRARY

Voting “no” on the library levy is no way to correct the problem of misguided tax policies and benefits to special interests. It would not convince our politicians to mend their ways nor would it improve the current funding mechanism. Instead, it would punish library users, including students, computer users and residents who need expanded access to a local branch. Clean up the bathwater, but don’t throw the baby out.

Sara van Dyck, Eugene

 

I am a cis woman in my mid 20s. I get a pang or a spasm of pain in a place deep in my clit/urethra area. I can’t pinpoint which part exactly. It takes me by surprise every time it happens, so I jerk around and press my crotch for a hot second—which doesn’t help, but it’s about the only thing I can do. This obviously does not look cool in public, and regardless of when it happens, the episode irritates me. Around four or five convulsions happen and then quickly it’s over. There’s no pattern—it happens at random times and anywhere from one to four times daily.

As I wind down the first section of an around-the-world bicycle tour for climate action, life on the road is shifting. Seasons, climate, gears and landscapes change, and into the mountains we go.

When I got to the morning writing course I teach at Lane Community College on Tuesday, I asked my students, “How many of you were worried about coming to class today?” Several students raised their hands. Looking around at their peers, several more put their hands in the air. 

It was the first time our class met after a student in a writing course at Umpqua Community College came to class Oct. 1 armed with six guns and used them to kill eight fellow students, his writing instructor and finally, himself. He also wounded nine other students in a shooting spree he appears to have foreshadowed with threats on the internet bulletin board 4Chan.

Campuses in Oregon and around the country are mourning the news coming out of Umpqua Community College Oct. 1 after word of the mass shooting spread. The first week of class is often a time of newness, learning and excitement. This year, it has brought great sadness.

But it also brings a sense of unity. Football players from longtime rivals Oregon State University and the University of Oregon wore “UCC” decals on their helmets in a sign of solidarity. The UO, OSU, Lane Community College and others all held vigils on their respective campuses in remembrance of those lost, and #RoseburgStrong was joined by #IamUCC to support a grieving community. 

Many OSU and UO students really are UCC — the community college’s graduates go on to earn their bachelor’s and graduate degrees from Oregon’s state universities. When so much talk is made of rivalries and civil wars, it’s heartening to see collaboration and unification in our places of learning.

This year’s Back to Campus issue features EW’s ever-entertaining student Q&As, advice for Ducks new or old, a look at OSU’s seven hubs of cultural learning and more. Remember, no matter what your school colors, we’re all in this together.

It’s that time of year again! Time to crack open some beers … I mean books. 

This is the first fall in four years that I won’t be returning to campus. So now, as a grad, I’m passing on my top five things you need to know about being a Duck. 

The sun was shining and the leaves were falling as Eugene Weekly and its cadre of fantastic local artists presented ArtsHound on Broadway on Lane Art Council’s First Friday ArtWalk Oct. 2, a project we have been working on since May. 

When you’re a student, things get busy. Maybe you’re stuck studying in your apartment and, while starving, find the prospect of going out into the world for food unbearable. Maybe you just want to “Netflix and chill” without leaving the couch. 

If so, you can utilize HungryDucks as your take-out shortcut, or contact Cascadian Courier Collective to get almost anything delivered, so long as it isn’t more than 300 pounds and can fit on one of its freight bicycles.

Brandon Hosea

Major: Economics and public relations

Year: Senior

Age: 21

Hometown: Bend, Oregon

 

Would you vote for Donald Trump?

Yeah.

Why?

Because I respect his ambition. Honestly, I agree with some of the stuff he says, some of it I don’t — you can’t agree with everything.

Lane Community College’s water conservation technician program — one of only a few like it in the country — hasn’t had enough students to fill a cohort since 2012.

The college is still offering it — though enrollment is zero — because skills in water conservation may soon be in demand as communities reassess how they think about water, in part due to drought. 

The seventh annual Great Willamette Clean Up Saturday, Oct. 3, saw a record turnout of 400 volunteers in Lane County to haul truckloads of trash, tires and abandoned household and camping items from the river shallows, riparian areas and islands. Another 400 volunteers were involved along the Willamette in other counties all the way to Scappoose Bay north of Portland. Kayaks, canoes and drift boats provided access to areas not accessible by foot. 

Oregon’s 2016 big-game hunting regulations will be on the agenda when the Fish and Wildlife Commission meets in Florence Oct. 8 and 9. 

Specifically the commission will discuss opening up target areas where “cougar numbers will be proactively reduced in response to established criteria” for cougar conflicts with humans, livestock or other game animals such as mule deer.

As the city of Roseburg and the community around Umpqua Community College try to process and recover from the Oct. 1 mass shooting that killed nine people and injured nine more, Oregon and the nation are seeking answers for why the shooter, who also died, would bring six guns to campus and seek to murder his writing class. 

ODOT is currently spraying roadsides. Call Tony Kilmer at ODOT District 5 at 744-8080 or call (888) 996-8080 for herbicide application information. Hwys. I-5, 99 and 126 were recently sprayed. According to an Oct. 1 notification, ODOT plans to spray Hwy. 36 from Junction City to Mapleton including near schools, beginning Oct. 15. This will be the fourth time this year Hwy. 36 will be sprayed.

As a young Native American student at UCLA, Allison Davis-White Eyes says that at first, she just wanted to blend in. It wasn’t until her sophomore year that she realized she needed to find a place to process her experiences and find others of a similar background.

Eventually, Davis-White Eyes connected with her campus’ Native American organization. “I’m very thankful for that connection,” she says, “because it helped me demystify the academic experience. At the same time, I realized that it’s important to be in dialogue with everyone else on campus.”

• We’re all looking for answers after yet another terrible tragic shooting in our country, again in our state. Are Americans so gripped with fear that they turn to guns to protect them from everything? Have we become a mean-spirited people, putting too many people in prison, offering meager social services and diminished public education, shrinking our mental health programs, including school counseling? Do we glorify violence all the way from endless wars, games and entertainment, to amped-up cheap crime coverage in the media? Are the arms merchants selling us out?

PeaceHealth Medical Group (PMG) has a new anti-marijuana policy that was posted about the same time recreational marijuana become legal for adults in Oregon. The policy reads, “Our doctors are not able to sign Oregon State attending physician’s statements for medical marijuana, even though some of our providers have signed the forms in the past.” The memo was signed by Robin Virgin, M.D. of Vancouver, Washington, who is the medical director of primary care at PMG.

Before Oct. 1, I was in the habit of introducing my hometown with a bit of apologetic nonchalance. “I’m from Roseburg. It’s an hour and a half south of Eugene. Pretty small. You’ve probably passed through on I-5.”

I now envision a future where I introduce my hometown, and a bell of recognition dings in people’s minds — Roseburg, a place where one mass shooting among far too many shootings has devastated a community.

Blood banks in Oregon responded to the Umpqua Community College mass shooting Oct. 1 and are now trying to replenish their supplies of red cells, platelets and plasma. Blood types A along with B negative and O negative are needed. The Lane Blood Center is at 2211 Willamette Street. Drop by or better yet, call 484-9112 ext. 700 to make an appointment and avoid waiting.

Raised on a farm outside Cincinnati, Ohio, Rose Elder rode public school buses to Guardian Angel Catholic Grammar School, 3 miles away, and to high school at St. Joseph’s Academy in the city. Later the family moved to Phoenix, Arizona, for her father’s health. “He died when I was 20,” says Elder, who had six months of college in Phoenix before she began working for California Water and Telephone. “We called it California Drip and Tinkle.

Music News & notes from down in the Willamette valley.

If time is just a sequence of moments — a metered arrangement of flashes and blips set upon a far-flung scale — are there really such things as minutes and hours? Does history groove to a cosmic cabasa? Are rules of rhythm inherent within us or forged across ages of concrete occurrence?

The members of Mudhoney will forever be classified as the Godfathers of Grunge, and for good reason. Their debut — 1989’s aptly named Superfuzz Bigmuff — set the grunge-rock template, stirring punk-rock sneer with metal riffs and drenching it all in distortion. 

The Pacific Northwest has left its mark on Wayne Horvitz’s music. Like his colleague, guitarist Bill Frisell, the jazz pianist and composer’s move from New York’s 1980s downtown music scene to Seattle sparked music of considerably broader appeal than the more avant-garde styles he was known for on the East Coast.