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Oregonians convicted or arrested for marijuana offenses could have their records expunged this year if a recent amendment in the Oregon Legislature passes. Dense and lengthy House Bill 3400 is the Legislature’s catch-all bill for regulating Oregon’s burgeoning recreational pot industry and aligning it with the state’s already legal medical marijuana commerce and production. 

• Eugene’s Multi-Unit Property Tax Exemption (MUPTE) was portrayed in a public forum this week as the salvation for downtown, both past and future, even though MUPTE has had a much bigger impact on the West University area than it has had on downtown.

The Eugene Mini Maker Faire is happening from 10 am to 4 pm Saturday, June 13, at the Science Factory at 2300 Leo Harris Parkway on the edge of Alton Baker Park. Featured will be dozens of booths and exhibits focusing on the art, technique and technology of making things, from 3D printing to rocketry to weaving. The event is geared to kids and adults and costs $3 for Science Factory members, $6 for the general public. Tickets can be purchased at the door or in advance at eugenemakerfaire.com. 

 • The Eugene Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meets at 5:30 pm Thursday, June 11, at the Atrium Sloat Room, 99 W. 10th Ave. On the agenda is the new YMCA design and the Civic Stadium property.

• The Eugene Police Commission meets at 5:30 pm Thursday, June 11, at the EPD Headquarters Kilcullen Room, 300 Country Club Road. On the agenda is the civil disturbances policy.

Like downtown Eugene itself, the “Sidewalk to Catwalk” runway show grows each year, showcasing new faces and businesses. 

Earthquake day in Nepal minus one — 2 pm Friday, April 24, I’m in a coffee shop in Berkeley. I hit the “send” button on a newsletter to my fellow Nepal 7 RPCV’s (Returned Peace Corps Volunteers) for our 50th reunion in August. My husband, Tom, and I are visiting here from Eugene to attend a dinner for retired Berkeley cops (my husband’s career) and to visit our son’s family. An hour later, 46 out of 76 have opened the newsletter. Success!

Few things in the plant world are as blue as the flowers on the bluest ceanothus. Otherwise known as wild lilac or California lilac, shrubs of this genus (which are not lilacs at all) are native to the Americas, mostly California and south to Guatemala. The majority are evergreen. That and their often stunning flower color makes the genus popular in gardens. Wild lilacs with the deepest blue flowers mostly come from California species, but Oregon has several species well worth growing. 

“I was born on the bayou,” says Dennis Hebert of Houma, Louisiana. “When a hurricane came, we’d board everything up and feel the house shake.” Hebert left the University of Southwest Louisiana in Lafayette to get married, but instead got drafted. He received a Dear John letter and a Purple Heart in Vietnam. He finished a marketing degree on the GI Bill, moved to Phoenix and started doing carpentry. He traveled the West for three years in his 1961 International van, the Turtle, picking up jobs along the way. Returning to Phoenix in 1981, he met a lady, Larena.

This first week of retirement has been pretty uneventful so far … except for my new top-secret assignment from Gov. Kate Brown. But more about that later. 

Kevin Seconds, founding member of veteran punk-rock band 7 Seconds, says punk needs young people. “I always did say punk and hardcore is driven by the youth,” Seconds tells EW. “Whether or not I agree with what they’re doing with it ­— a lot of times I don’t — it’s in their hands.” 

Hailing from Chico, California, Cold Blue Mountain combines the simple, riff-driven approach of moderately paced doom, the frenetic energy of hardcore and the melodic elements of ’90s alternative rock to craft a highly accessible, unique brand of metal all its own. 

Note to the Lane Board of County Commissioners: Refusing to enforce laws because we don’t like them is flirting with anarchy. Before going anarchy all the way, I wish you would paint a center stripe on the street in front of my house.

Born Jo-Vaughn Scott to parents from the Caribbean, Joey Bada$$ cofounded hip-hop collective Pro Era in 2010. He was just 15 years old.  

California’s Dr. Know are no strangers to change. The early years of these godfathers of “nardcore” were filled with fights, going through no less than eight vocalists and some inarguably excellent punk rock. Their 1983 compilations We Got Power, Party Or Go Home and It Came From Slimy Valley are championed as classics, but also showcase a band riddled by constant change. 

The Very Little Theatre’s current main stage production Superior Donuts, directed by Stanley Coleman, is a work of both comedic and dramatic realism, like a buddy film with a twist of gut-wrenching social commentary. 


I haven’t read anything about the trees downtown that are slated to go down this summer. The one by the Eugene Public Library on Charnelton is doomed, but there are 10 trees on 11th and Olive, across from The Kiva, that will go when the bulldozers come to demolish Musgrove Mortuary. One of them has already been dug up and moved.

A mole in a pout is a sight to behold, rare, and slightly scary. Thinking I was early, I had ridden the wheezing Otis to the 15th floor of Eugene’s oldest high-rise, shuffled down the hall to our office, Wine Investigations, found Mole already in our lab, in a mope. “Hey, Sleut’,” he said, “whatcha got from all yer trackin’ wit’ out me?”

As Ex Machina opens, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), a lanky, awkward coder of some sort, wins a staff prize. He’s whisked off to the middle of nowhere, landing in a glass-and-concrete home-slash-bunker where his company’s founder, Nathan (Oscar Isaac), is out boxing on the deck. Nathan is a man of extremes: shaven head, giant beard, either drinking himself into a stupor or working himself into a sweat. 

A big congrats to Caitlyn Jenner on her big reveal and lovely Vanity Fair cover! But I am having a crisis of conscience. On one hand, I support a person’s right to be whoever the heck they want to be. You want to wear women’s clothing and use makeup and style your hair? You look fabulous! You want to carry a pillow around with an anime character on it and get married to it, like a guy in Korea did? Congrats! You want to collect creepy lifelike dolls and push them around in a stroller, like a woman on Staten Island does? Great!

Welcome to the next four months of your life. It’s finally time to pack away the umbrella (if you even have one — what kind of Eugenean are you?) and break out the sunglasses. Consider this guide your roadmap for the summer. Within this issue that you’ve wisely chosen to pick up, you’ll find wonders galore, from weeklong stargazing parties to kite-flying extravaganzas to wild three-day music festivals. Sounds fun? Yeah, we thought so. Use this knowledge wisely, and you’re guaranteed to have an amazing and memorable summer. So go on, get out there! And have a great time.

Pretty Paper
LCC reboots its continuing education courses in fashion with an emphasis on recycled materials and textiles

Flying High
Catch the breeze at Oregon’s summer kite festivals

Party with the Stars
The Eugene Astronomical Society is always looking up

Extreme Golfing
Cruise up to the green with GolfBoarding

Golfing is to sports what masturbation is to sex — a solitary endeavor that, no matter how vigorously you go at it, always ends up being about you and you alone, as you come face to face with your own failings in the universe as well as the measure of your stamina in overcoming them. I’ve been golfing, more or less vigorously, for years, and I’m sad to report that my game hasn’t improved one jot. It’s an existential dilemma. Golf, for me, is too often a good walk spoiled, just like people think Mark Twain said.

Before Connor Doran’s indoor kite-flying performances were wowing television audiences on season five of NBC’s America’s Got Talent, he was tearing up the skies on the beach at Lincoln City’s annual Summer Kite Festival. “It’s where I started out,” Doran says, who will perform at the next iteration of the annual kite festival in late June alongside a host of other champion kite fliers.

Nesting season is coming to a close this month, easily noticed with geese and turkey nestlings that leave their nests and swim or run right after hatching. One of the enjoyable sights of early summer is watching a troop of goslings or chicks paddling or scurrying around after their parents. They are out feeding for themselves, learning how to find and handle their food by following their parents. Most songbird babies stay in the nest until they are ready to fly. After they fledge and leave the nest, they are pretty much on their own.

For 25 years, the Hubble Space Telescope has captured images of astronomic wonders — nebulae, galaxies, star clusters — that exist millions of light years away from Earth. These pictures are spectacular, but for members of the Eugene Astronomical Society, there’s nothing quite like looking at the night sky with their own eyes.