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When young actors and actresses think of where to kickstart their careers, what often comes to mind is locations like L.A. or New York. Even though the Conforth sisters may be headed that way, they’ve already made a name for themselves right here in Lane County.

Sisters Cyra, Kenady and Campbell Conforth — ages 18, 14 and 11, respectively — live in Cottage Grove. The trio is heavily involved in dance and musical theater both there and here in Eugene, and the eldest two have taken part in The Shedd’s Musical Theatre Training Academy. 

Theater is a battleground.

As the most atavistic of art forms — live drama in the age of digital clones — theater is in a continual struggle for relevance, now more so than ever. Film is indeed a beautiful medium, but it’s more static than fluid; there will only ever be one Citizen Kane.

Theater, on the other hand, involves a beautiful risk, and that risk is fluid. Theater is a machine of perpetual motion, fraught with all the potential for grace and error of which the human animal is capable.

Once a jewel in Eugene’s cultural crown, the Oregon Bach Festival now looks as good as dead after last week’s unexplained — and inexplicable — firing of artistic director Matthew Halls.

The big problem is, no one — including Halls — seems to be clear on just why he was let go.

Although racist, xenophobic and gender-motivated incidents are not new in Eugene, these acts of aggression have more than doubled over those reported during the same period in 2016, according to data from the city’s Office of Equity and Human Rights. 

The city of Eugene is aiming to complete construction for a park and other riverfront redevelopment by 2021. The future park is part of the city’s Riverfront Urban Renewal District, which includes 16 acres of riverfront property sold by the Eugene Water and Electric Board to the city for $5.75 million in 2016.

Starting in the early ’90s, Gary Hale and his wife, Jan Wroncy, who died in 2016, tracked herbicide sprays in Lane County. Concerns about herbicides travelling via waterways or drifting onto their property led the family to research potential spray sites and subscribe to a mail-in, pay-for-information system run by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF).

It’s 10 in the morning on a Saturday last spring, and Very Little Theatre has its doors wide open. Hopeful actors sit inside the building, tapping their feet and talking in quiet whispers. The theater itself is dark like the interior of a ship’s wooden hull, but the stage lights are shining on a set.

This is audition day at one of the oldest community theaters in the country — and hearts are racing. The show these hopefuls are auditioning for is British playwright Robin Hawdon’s Perfect Wedding, the penultimate show in the theater’s 2016-2017 season.

Campbell Global, 541-809-0093, plans to hire A&H Forestry, 503-467-1255, to spray roadsides near Finn Rock with glyphosate, triclopyr with ester, triclopyr with amine, MSO Concentrate and/or No Foam. See ODF notification 2017-771-10809, call Brian Dally at 541-726-3588 with questions.

Compiled by Gary Hale, Forestland Dwellers: 342-8332, forestlanddwellers.org

The air quality in Lane County has been horrendous thanks to more than 300,000 acres of Oregon forests on fire. Houston, Texas, is facing 50 devastating inches of rain — the same amount of rainfall the city usually gets in a year — over just a matter of days. Weather and climate are not the same, but there is no question that climate governs the weather. Climate change is real, and all the predictions for bigger storms and hotter summers are coming true. Now let’s keep talking about what we can do to stop it from getting worse.

Summer’s waning, but the party’s not over yet. You still have a few more chances to get your groove on. 

I like to float rivers. That’s a huge understatement. There is almost nothing that I would rather be doing than floating on a river. 

Green Lane Sustainable Business Network is holding its monthly luncheon Wednesday, Sept. 6, 11:30 am to 1 pm at the First United Methodist Church, 1376 Olive Street. The topic is the benefits of electric vehicles for your business. Vegetarian lunch is optional, $12 per person for lunch, $5 per person if not eating. More info at greenlane-sbn.org.

I’ve been working six or seven days a week,” says Hal Hushbeck, native plant nursery manager for the Friends of Buford Park and Mount Pisgah, who oversees the production of more than 100 species of native flowers, grasses, shrubs and trees. He works with a paid field crew of four and a pool of 50 volunteers. Starts, bulbs and seeds from the nursery are planted to restore native habitats in the park and in neighboring areas. “We do fee-for-service restoration on the Nature Conservancy’s Willamette Confluence project and on the power line right-of-way,” he says.

I was born in 1976. Early memories I retain from around that era include a black van my parents had with actual carpet inside of it, Star Wars action figures,and watching Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom and The Muppet Show.

In the early 1980s, classic New York hardcore band Reagan Youth sang “We are Reagan Youth!” dropping a “sieg heil” for satirical effect. This was in keeping with punk’s rejection of flower-power’s pacifist tendencies in favor of more confrontational approaches.

HOUSING HYPOCRISY

In “Say Adieu to fees for ADUs” (EW, Aug. 17), Terri Harding continues Eugene planner’s “alternative facts” campaign against single-family homeowners. Harding claims the Eugene City Council “passed some amendments to our zoning code in 2013” that accidentally made secondary dwelling units (SDUs) more difficult to build.

Actually, the City Council approved Ordinance 20526 in 2014 to provide protections for single-family neighborhoods around the University of Oregon. As Harding well knows, the amendments were no “accident.”

My brother just broke up with his girlfriend for the second time in eight months. They had been together for two and a half years, and she became pretty discontent when she finished college and my brother entered law school because all his time and attention weren’t revolving around her. In January, she staged this bizarre, soap-opera-esque situation to make my brother jealous, and then broke up with him when he reacted predictably.

My favorite moment in writer-director Taylor Sheridan’s new thriller Wind River comes at the very end of the film. Cory Lambert (Jeremy Renner), a Fish and Wildlife tracker who’s assisted the FBI in a rape and homicide investigation, comes to visit his friend Martin (Gil Birmingham), the grieving father of the Native American teenager discovered by Lambert at the start of the film lying bloodied and frozen in the snowy Wyoming tundra.

Longtime co-owners of Eugene favorites Belly and Belly Taqueria, Brendan and Ann Marie Mahaney plan to move to Portland in early 2018 to ponder new avenues and do a little more yoga. 

At 9 am on Aug. 21, Salem’s downtown streets were sparsely populated with cars and people. As the moon slowly began to cover the sun, people who were stopped in parking lots and sitting on sidewalks gazed toward the sky. 

Josh Beals says he doesn’t remember getting the citations that brought him to Eugene’s Community Court — because he was, as he describes it, “on a vodka spree.” What he does remember is waking up in a field, with all his belongings stolen, and a fractured skull. That, he says, was his turning point.

Ten months after the incident, as he stood for the second time before a judge, a group of lawyers and a collection of other defendants, he hoped it would be the last time he found himself on the wrong side of the law.

Firefighter Mike Simon III has slept in a tent on the beach of the Dexter Reservoir in Lowell since Aug. 16. His exhausted brother, nephew and cousins also sleep in nearby tents each night.

These family members are with a 20-member crew of Alaskan Natives who took three rural plane flights to travel from their tiny fishing village of Hooper Bay, Alaska, to Eugene to fight the Jones Fire, which is burning about 10 miles outside Lowell in the Willamette National Forest.

Kenny Jacoby

 et al.

According to Eugene Weekly’s analysis of Municipal Court data, one out of every four people whom the Eugene Police Department (EPD) tickets or arrests for a non-driving charge is homeless, and more than one-third of all the charges brought in the city’s municipal court are filed against people who lacked permanent addresses at some point last year. [See “Criminalizing Homelessness,” in the June 1 issue.]

Seneca Jones Timber is hiring Avel Salgado (541-520-5941) to ground spray 56.9 acres with imazapyr and triclopyr just north of Douglas Creek in west Lane County. Call Ted Reiss with questions (541-689-1011).  Notification # 781-10167.

Giustina Resources (541-485-1500) is hiring Craig Shimp, Sherwood, (503-467-1255) to ground spray roadsides on 84.4 acres just south of Lowell across Dexter Lake with glyphosate and triclopyr. Notification # 771-10079.