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Hailing from merry old England, Brighton’s Fujiya & Miyagi play up-tempo, minimal electro-pop that is addictive and danceable but, most of all, very, very British. Listen to the group’s 2014 release, Artificial Sweeteners, and you’ll hear UK dance-punk, house and hip-hop music as well as the sort of heady minimalism practiced by German bands like Can and Neu, groups that came to be known as Krautrock. 

This is your last chance to score tickets to Ballet Fantastique’s 5X5 celebration Friday, Oct.10, at the Hult Center, featuring dinner, performances, an auction and after party (Good thing dancers have a lot of stamina). Proceeds from the 5X5 shindig benefit Ballet Fantastique’s educational outreach programs. Tickets are $55-$155 at balletfantastique.org. 

In case you haven’t noticed, the students are back in town, and EW has been out on the streets talking with them. We asked them how they feel about marijuana legalization (“a political farce”) and about their favorite and least favorite things about their school (depending on who you ask, “sports culture” qualifies for both). Our papers are in boxes at LCC and Corvallis as well as Eugene, so we ventured to all three campuses this year with stories about student homelessness, video game development, campus sustainability and how recycling is an awesome way to furnish your dorm. So welcome back, students, and because we know how ridiculously exorbitant your tuition is, don’t worry: This issue is on us.

On their first ever trip to the United States, prominent Russian literary figures Ivan Akhmetev and Tatiana Neshumova will present a series of lectures at the University of Oregon, starting Friday, Oct. 3. Here’s a taste of what they have to share. For more details see our What’s Happening Calendar.

Andrea Norris of OSU’s Campus Recycling says the weirdest thing she’s ever tried to sell at the OSUsed Store is an entire pallet of 20-year-old unused jock straps. Although they didn’t exactly fly off the shelves in the campus second-hand store, Norris put the jock straps on eBay, and they started selling fast. “It turns out there are antique jock strap collectors,” she says.

Even at 5 years old, LCC alumnus Coral Breding expressed an interest in art. When he realized he could use his art skills and 3D animation software to create art for video games, he was hooked. 

The weekend after Labor Day brought the sight of thousands of choice edible russula mushrooms around Waldo Lake, but most were dry as a bone. A single thunderstorm’s drenching a week earlier brought them out of the forest floor. Then they were betrayed by the summer’s continuing heat and drought. Nevertheless, we can be hopeful that the usual October beginning of the rainy season may yet bless the high mountains with a bounty of delicious treasures. We will find out at the mushroom show at Mount Pisgah Arboretum on Oct. 26.

Fronting Franklin Boulevard and cozied up like a cat against the much larger University of Oregon, the campus of Northwest Christian University has sat for well nigh 125 years as a curiosity to some and a beacon to others. What, after all, is a Christian university all about? Jesus himself was a peripatetic teacher, opting to wander the wilderness with his radical message of universal love and liberation from the false knowledge of the Pharisees.

Photos by Trask Bedortha

 

Lorenzo Chicas-Cruz

Age: 19

Major: Auto technician

Year: Freshman

Hometown: Eugene, Oregon

School: LCC

How do you get to campus?

By car.

How are you paying for college?

Working for it, and my parents are helping me a little.

In the days before the snowstorm last December, Cory*, a Lane Community College student, was having trouble getting words down on the page. 

“I’ve always been a troubled writer,” Cory says. “Just too meticulous and apprehensive, I guess.” He wasn’t accustomed to using a computer and spent days writing out paragraphs of his classwork by hand. For one class, though, it was never good enough. Intimidated by his classmates’ “beautiful” work, Cory chose not to turn in his final project, and he failed the class. That weekend, the Willamette Valley froze and filled with snow. At that point, failing wasn’t his biggest problem. Cory was, and is, homeless.

The expansive atrium of Oregon State University’s Kelley Engineering Building fills with the mid-morning chatter of students. Light streams in through the immense glass windows of this certified Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold building, reducing the need for electric lighting as it illuminates half-built solar vehicles that look like Mars rovers in a nearby classroom, complete with solar panels and heavy duty wheels.

About 230 trees will be cut down as part of the west Eugene expansion of LTD’s EmX bus rapid transit system, including a pair of stately big cedars by Hollywood Video on 7th Avenue. But Friends of Trees is not protesting. In fact, Erik Burke, director of Eugene’s FOT, says he welcomes what he sees as LTD’s long-term investment in Eugene’s urban tree canopy.

• ODOT recently sprayed Highways 36, 126 and Territorial Highway. For daily information call ODOT Herbicide Application Information Line, (888) 996-8080. You may also call Tony Kilmer at the Springfield office at 744-8080 for herbicide and additives information and to ask what time a highway was sprayed.

Oregon DEQ is accepting comments through 5 pm Wednesday, Oct. 8, on the proposed issuance of a water quality permit for Lane County’s Underground Injection Control System (UICs), which consists of 88 stormwater drywells in the Eugene-Springfield area that collect stormwater from municipal rights-of-way and direct it into the ground. Studies indicate that such stormwater contains pollutants such as metals from brake pads and chemicals associated with incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. For more information go to goo.gl/GWZX96.

With a disarming smile and a lilting baritone made for public radio, Rick Steves has been making traveling the world less frightening for the past 30 years. Through his European travel guidebooks and public radio and television programs, he has introduced Americans to a kinder, more accessible world outside of our own. 

This October, Steves is taking a different kind of trip — a six-day tour around Oregon to calm our nerves in regards to November’s Measure 91, which would legalize, tax and regulate recreational marijuana.

Thirty-five percent of female and 14 percent of male participants in a UO campus survey had at least one nonconsensual sexual experience during college, and 10 percent of female and 0.3 percent of male participants were raped. 

What’s next for City Hall? We may see some buyer’s remorse from city councilors when they eventually confront the real costs of their decision to tear down our full-block City Hall and built a little City Hall on the rubble. The final price tag of a “light-filled” and truly energy-efficient building could be a lot more than the estimated $11 million for the Phase I construction.

At least three new hotels are popping up on the drawing boards for Eugene and some might actually get built. One hotel is included in proposals for redevelopment of the EWEB surplus property, a seven-story hotel is back on the expansion plans at Oakway Center and a third hotel was revealed in tentative plans for the Civic Stadium property. 

Jennifer Freyd and Carly Smith will speak on “Addressing Sexual Assault — From Institutional Betrayal to Institutional Courage” at City Club of Eugene at noon Friday, Oct. 3, at the Downtown Athletic Club, 999 Willamette St. Freyd and Smith will explain how they measure institutional betrayal and what they have learned from their research, which has focused on institutional response to military and campus sexual assault. $5 for non-members. See cityclubofeugene.org. The Oct.

As one who has worked for 25 years in Oregon to increase voter choice and participation, I can say this about Measure 90: It is one of the most dangerous and deceptive election “reform” proposals I have even seen.

Hot on the trail of Portland Fashion Week, the 5th annual Eugene Fashion Week (EFW) is upon us and much has changed since its humble beginnings. New venues, new faces, new lines and new ideas will pop up Oct. 6-13 across downtown and the Whit. The week kicks off with a meet-and-greet where the public can rub shoulders with local designers, stylists, makeup artists, photographers and shop owners 6 pm Monday, Oct. 6, at Belly, 30 E. Broadway. Here’s a runway rundown of what’s new and what you shouldn’t miss at EFW 2014.

The son of a doctor and a nurse, Peter Ogura grew up in suburban St. Louis, Missouri. “It was a Leave it to Beaver kind of childhood,” he says. “We were big patrons of the St. Louis County Library.” After high school, he headed west to Colorado College, where he changed his major from English to political science. “I came out to Eugene for a couple of weeks in 1975,” he says, “to visit friends from home.” He continued westward to San Francisco for law school at USF. “It was there that I got into reading fiction,” he says.

When a sleek, curvy, dark figure entered her life, Melissa Ruth knew her future would look different. She was writing songs for her second album, 2011’s Aint No Whiskey, when it came to her. 

Rearrange some Steel Cranes songs, add a little fiddle and steel guitar, and you’d have some no-nonsense, woman-done-wrong country music.