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Roseburg Resources, 541-679-3311, plans to spray 122.1 acres in Douglas and Lane Counties with a long list of chemicals on their lands south of Veneta and in the Oxbow Burn area. See ODF notification 2017-781-08835, call Dan Menk at 541-935-2283 with questions.

 

Franklin Clarkson Timber Co LLC, 541-214-1435, plans to spray 1641.9 acres south of Blue River and north of Dexter Lake with imazapyr, triclopyr, Crosshair, Foam Buster, Grounded, MSO Concentrate and/or No Foam. See ODF notification 2017-771-08761, call Brian Dally at 541-726-3588 with questions.

• When even our 10-year-old friend asks what’s going to happen on the old city hall/new county courthouse lot in downtown Eugene, it must be time to look for an answer.

Any suggestions? It will be at least three years, probably more, before ground breaks for a courthouse.

Should we have a garden? Or even trees around the edges? Remember those old-fashioned big-top circuses — wouldn’t that be fun? How about a giant art installation?

After relentless advocacy, the 82,500-acre Elliott State Forest in the Oregon Coast will remain in public ownership. To celebrate this environmentalist victory, Cascadia Wildlands, Mountain Rose Herbs and Thinking Tree Spirits are hosting a Victory Celebration for the Elliott State Forest from 6 to 10 pm Saturday, July 29. Musical entertainment includes Soul Vibrator, Tony Riedl’s La Famille and Norma Fraser Reggae Band, and there will be cocktails, food carts and face-painting for kids.

Why write a column about economic development? Lots of people just yawn when they hear the term. But, as they say, write about what you know, and I do know economic development. I did it for a living. And, besides, I actually find it interesting.

“My parents were apolitical,” says Shawn Donnille, who grew up in Orange County, California, a Republican stronghold. “Every summer we spent two weeks in Nevada City, an old mining community, and connected with plants and wildlife.” At age 15, Donnille started an environmental club at Villa Park High School. “We planted trees on campus,” he notes, “and organized monthly debates.” After high school, he moved to Nevada City and took part in Earth First! campaigns to save redwood forests and to ban sport hunting of cougars.

A wanderer of the woods always needs a compass and a map. Singer-songwriter Ayla Nereo sings with imagery thick as an old-growth forest and provides direction with her finely syncopated loop pedals and percussive rhythms.

“The problem with genres is you don’t get to pick,” Minnesota musician Charlie Parr tells me over the phone from his favorite Eugene café. He doesn’t play Eugene for a few days yet, but he’s pit-stopped here for lunch on his way to California. “They just assign you one,” he says. 

'BA-ROCK' SPIRIT AT BACH FEST

Applause for Will Kennedy’s “Bach for the 21st Century” (July 13). I especially appreciated Kennedy’s “outsider” probes about the festival’s relevance, audience and programming.

Paintings by Bets Cole on display through July at Karin Clarke Gallery show the long-time local artist at her relaxed, assured best.

I’m a 35-year-old straight woman, recently married, and everything is great. But I have been having problems reaching orgasm. When we first started dating, I had them all the time. It was only after we got engaged that it became an issue. He is not doing anything differently, and he works hard to give me oral pleasure, last longer, and include more foreplay. He’s sexy and attractive and has a great working penis. I am very aroused when we have sex, but I just can’t climax. It is weird because I used to very easily, and still can when I masturbate.

Where to begin with The Little Hours, a new comedy written and directed by Jeff Baena and based on Boccaccio’s 1353 masterpiece The Decameron?

Former Eugene mayor Kitty Piercy and her husband, David Piercy, went on a trip to Cuba earlier this year. After nearly a century of United States presidents refusing to respect Cuba, President Obama’s visit there during his second term signified a less hostile relationship between the countries, allowing for tourism to resume. Piercy recounts her experience as “a little taste,” because at the time of her trip you had to be accompanied by a guide in order to be in the country. 

By 1829, nearly 80 years after his death, the music of Johann Sebastian Bach had fallen out of fashion. Think of what we were listening to 80 years ago: Bing Crosby, Count Basie and Benny Goodman. (And yes, someday your music will feel tired to your children’s children. Deal with it. It’s entropy. You’re programmed for irrelevance.)

Before holding his 54th town hall meeting of the year, Oregon U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden sat down with Eugene Weekly to answer questions about single-payer health care, the status of the Russia investigation and the Trump administration. Last week, Wyden joined Sen. Jeff Merkley and Rep. Peter DeFazio in a rally outside the federal courthouse in Eugene to oppose the proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017, the Senate version of TrumpCare.

Chance Dewitt is sowing grass seed on a farm outside his hometown of Lebanon, Oregon. But this isn’t where he makes a living. After a week at home, he’ll be flying back to Elko, Nevada, and working 12-hour shifts for two weeks straight mining gold amidst the arid sagebrush landscape there.

Val Hoyle, our popular Lane County Democrat who was majority leader of the Oregon House, told EW this week that she is going to run for Oregon Labor Commissioner in May 2018. Current Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian told Hoyle he doesn’t plan on running again once this term ends. A non-partisan election, this one will be over if a candidate garners more than 50 percent of the vote; if not, there’s a runoff. It’s good to have Val back in the arena, and labor commissioner is a fine fit for her. Next question: Who else will be running?


• Staff from the Office of Human Rights and Neighborhood Involvement, Eugene Police Department, elected officials and members of the groups including the NAACP, Trans*Ponder and Centro Latino Americano will release the 2016 Hate and Bias Report 10:30 am Thursday, July 13, at the Mims House, 330 High Street. The report documents hate and bias incidents — both criminal and non-criminal — that happened in Eugene in 2016.

As the Oregon Legislature wound down last week, I called a good friend of 20-plus years, Bob Livingston, a lobbyist and president of the Oregon State Firefighters Council. While we were often at odds during the PERS (Public Employees Retirement System) reform fight in 2003, we’ve maintained a strong trusting relationship over the years. 

Bay area songwriter and soul singer Quinn Deveaux has his own term to describe the music he plays: “blue beat dance music.”

Popular Eugene rock act Fortune’s Folly celebrates the release of its new EP, titled simply Red EP. And Fortune’s Folly vocalist Calysta Cheyenne tells EW the color red was used as inspiration for the music. “We chose songs that are powerful, fiery and energetic,” Cheyenne explains. 

If the dream of the ’90s is alive in Portland, the dream of the ’80s lives happily in Canby — at least for two days in July during Harefest, a tribute-band music festival — and that’s partially thanks to Jason Fellman.

Some things just won’t wait. Only two days before he was scheduled to conduct the Oregon Bach Festival’s opening night concert, Matthew Halls received urgent good news: the birth of his and his wife Erin’s son, Henry. While Halls flew to Toronto to be with his family, the festival implemented its backup plan: turning over the reins to Scott Allen Jarrett, who runs Boston’s renowned Back Bay Chorale, choral programs at Boston University and the OBF’s Vocal Fellows program, and reportedly did a bang up job directing Bach’s St. Matthew Passion here. 

ORPHANED ANIMALS

Excuse me, but I was just wondering …

Would it be at all possible to some way check the empty University of Oregon student housing apartments, dwellings, etc., for any “pets” abandoned this graduation season?

Please let “us” not let it happen again.

S. Parnelle, Fall Creek

 

MERKLEY IN 2020

I’m a gay medical student with a medical fetish, and I can’t even open up to my therapist about this. I think the fetish started when I was young; I was once in the hospital and given a suppository for a fever. Then one time I was given a Fleet enema. I don’t think the “butt stuff” turned me gay, but my fetish may stem from the aspect of being controlled. I grew up in a very conservative religious household. I’ve never been in a relationship, and I don’t know that I could have one while hiding what turns me on.