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Representatives from Nightingale Health Sanctuary met Aug. 29 with the Southeast Neighbors Board to discuss turning the one car camp in South Eugene into a full-functioning rest stop to provide shelter for the homeless.

A descendant of Eugene Skinner — the founder of the city of Eugene — is seeking to prevent the proposed land swap for a new Eugene City Hall and Lane County courthouse, on the grounds that such a trade would violate the legal requirements placed on the land when it was donated to the county.

Eugene Opera’s dramatic resurrection from near bankruptcy continued this week with the naming of Andrew Bizantz as artistic director and Erika Rauer as executive director. Bisantz is a familiar and much-loved figure at the podium here. Rauer, a soprano who’s performed at Oper Bremen, Opera Boston and Tanglewood, has also worked as director of education for New York City Opera and manager of elementary school programs at Carnegie Hall. The opera also announced a new season: Barber of Seville Dec.

• Belly Restaurant and Belly Taqueria once had the same owners, Brendan and Ann Marie Mahaney, but Belly Restaurant was sold to Diana and Steve Lee in 2015. Now the announcement of the taqueria’s closing (see our story Aug. 24) has caused some confusion for the popular downtown restaurant, which has no plans to close. Belly Restaurant at 30 E. Broadway is still very much in business. The taqueria at 454 Willamette Street will become a New Orleans-inspired restaurant called the Black Wolf Supper Club.

• There will be an interfaith prayer service with the theme “Seeing Light in Darkness,” 6:45 pm, Monday, Sept. 11 at the First Christian Church (1160 Oak Street in downtown Eugene). The gathering will “celebrate the oneness in our diversity through prayers, chants, readings from sacred texts and many other forms that come from the teachings and traditions of our participating presenters.” Those presenters include people of Muslim, Christian, Hindu and Jewish faiths, as well as an African-American storyteller, a Buddhist and the former mayor.

Chicago is a city of enormity — physically and energetically — and in its emotiveness lies a stoic beauty. From every beat of traffic, somber winter snowfall and thick pavement ripples of a city summer, Chicago-born soul artist Ravyn Lenae translates the heartbeat of the city into song. 

English heavy metal singer Blaze Bayley recalls sitting with his mother and watching early seasons of Star Trek and Doctor Who. Bayley feels this started a lifelong interest in sci-fi stories. “In those days, to see a door slide open by itself was unbelievable,” he says. “Now if you go to the mall and the door doesn’t open by itself, you’re amazed. I’ve got a full-blown computer in my phone. It’s unbelievable!”

A few years ago, Oregon-born pianist Hunter Noack was scheduled to play Arnold Schoenberg’s famous 1899 composition Transfigured Night at London’s Barbican Center. Since the original poem was set in a dark forest, Noack brought in 50 trees, playing the music as audience and actors dramatizing the story wandered through the impromptu indoor arbor.

SOUR GRAPES

Kendra Lady, in her Aug. 31 letter, made a very heartfelt and passionate point about the University of Oregon and its fans' “cult like” adoration of its Ducks sports program. It seems that the main point of her letter was not with the UO but with Eugene and our racist and bigoted past.

Just after I moved to Eugene about a year and a half ago, Eugene Weekly ran a story titled “Art: It Could Happen Here”. Written after the city-subsidized Jacobs Gallery had closed, the article suggested that Eugene might have to change its slogan from “A Great Place for the Arts and Outdoors” to “Eugene, A City Where People Go Outdoors.” Had I moved to a town without art?

I’m a lady considering taking on a foot fetishist as a slave. He would do chores around my house, including cleaning and laundry, and give foot rubs and pedicures in exchange for getting to worship and jack off to my model-perfect feet when I’ve decided he’s earned it. Am I morally obligated to tell my roommates? Technically the guy would be in their common space too. I will fully vet him with references and meet him in a neutral location at least once — and anything else you might suggest I do for security’s sake.

When young actors and actresses think of where to kickstart their careers, what often comes to mind is locations like L.A. or New York. Even though the Conforth sisters may be headed that way, they’ve already made a name for themselves right here in Lane County.

Sisters Cyra, Kenady and Campbell Conforth — ages 18, 14 and 11, respectively — live in Cottage Grove. The trio is heavily involved in dance and musical theater both there and here in Eugene, and the eldest two have taken part in The Shedd’s Musical Theatre Training Academy. 

Theater is a battleground.

As the most atavistic of art forms — live drama in the age of digital clones — theater is in a continual struggle for relevance, now more so than ever. Film is indeed a beautiful medium, but it’s more static than fluid; there will only ever be one Citizen Kane.

Theater, on the other hand, involves a beautiful risk, and that risk is fluid. Theater is a machine of perpetual motion, fraught with all the potential for grace and error of which the human animal is capable.

Once a jewel in Eugene’s cultural crown, the Oregon Bach Festival now looks as good as dead after last week’s unexplained — and inexplicable — firing of artistic director Matthew Halls.

The big problem is, no one — including Halls — seems to be clear on just why he was let go.

Although racist, xenophobic and gender-motivated incidents are not new in Eugene, these acts of aggression have more than doubled over those reported during the same period in 2016, according to data from the city’s Office of Equity and Human Rights. 

The city of Eugene is aiming to complete construction for a park and other riverfront redevelopment by 2021. The future park is part of the city’s Riverfront Urban Renewal District, which includes 16 acres of riverfront property sold by the Eugene Water and Electric Board to the city for $5.75 million in 2016.

Starting in the early ’90s, Gary Hale and his wife, Jan Wroncy, who died in 2016, tracked herbicide sprays in Lane County. Concerns about herbicides travelling via waterways or drifting onto their property led the family to research potential spray sites and subscribe to a mail-in, pay-for-information system run by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF).

It’s 10 in the morning on a Saturday last spring, and Very Little Theatre has its doors wide open. Hopeful actors sit inside the building, tapping their feet and talking in quiet whispers. The theater itself is dark like the interior of a ship’s wooden hull, but the stage lights are shining on a set.

This is audition day at one of the oldest community theaters in the country — and hearts are racing. The show these hopefuls are auditioning for is British playwright Robin Hawdon’s Perfect Wedding, the penultimate show in the theater’s 2016-2017 season.

Campbell Global, 541-809-0093, plans to hire A&H Forestry, 503-467-1255, to spray roadsides near Finn Rock with glyphosate, triclopyr with ester, triclopyr with amine, MSO Concentrate and/or No Foam. See ODF notification 2017-771-10809, call Brian Dally at 541-726-3588 with questions.

Compiled by Gary Hale, Forestland Dwellers: 342-8332, forestlanddwellers.org

The air quality in Lane County has been horrendous thanks to more than 300,000 acres of Oregon forests on fire. Houston, Texas, is facing 50 devastating inches of rain — the same amount of rainfall the city usually gets in a year — over just a matter of days. Weather and climate are not the same, but there is no question that climate governs the weather. Climate change is real, and all the predictions for bigger storms and hotter summers are coming true. Now let’s keep talking about what we can do to stop it from getting worse.

Summer’s waning, but the party’s not over yet. You still have a few more chances to get your groove on. 

I like to float rivers. That’s a huge understatement. There is almost nothing that I would rather be doing than floating on a river. 

Green Lane Sustainable Business Network is holding its monthly luncheon Wednesday, Sept. 6, 11:30 am to 1 pm at the First United Methodist Church, 1376 Olive Street. The topic is the benefits of electric vehicles for your business. Vegetarian lunch is optional, $12 per person for lunch, $5 per person if not eating. More info at greenlane-sbn.org.

I’ve been working six or seven days a week,” says Hal Hushbeck, native plant nursery manager for the Friends of Buford Park and Mount Pisgah, who oversees the production of more than 100 species of native flowers, grasses, shrubs and trees. He works with a paid field crew of four and a pool of 50 volunteers. Starts, bulbs and seeds from the nursery are planted to restore native habitats in the park and in neighboring areas. “We do fee-for-service restoration on the Nature Conservancy’s Willamette Confluence project and on the power line right-of-way,” he says.