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West Eugene EmX might have a bigger effect on your sex toy habit than on most West 11th businesses.

As LTD’s West Eugene EmX Extension continues its early planning stages, real estate analyst Richard Duncan presented to City Council this week an overview of effects the bus rapid transit project would likely have on properties on the route, along with suggestions of how to minimize effects on properties and avoid code issues.

• We’re sad to hear of the passing of Svitlana Kravchenko, the much-lauded director of the UO’s masters program in environmental and natural resources law. She died Feb. 10 in Eugene at the too-young age of 62. She was known worldwide for her strong advocacy for reforming public policy on environmental matters. She traveled and lectured in dozens of countries and authored 12 books and hundreds of academic articles.

New downtown business is the topic of City Club of Eugene at 11:50 am Friday, Feb. 17, at the Hilton, lobby level. Main speakers are Tony Stirpe of Crumb Together and Katie Griffin of Kaleidoscope Clothing. See cityclubofeugene.org

Starting this week, Falling Sky Brewing is now open for lunch daily at 11 am, serving locally sourced food, at the Brew House, 1334 Oak Alley, near the shop at 30 E. 13th. See fallingskybrewing.com

Work Dance Company is about to grace the Hult Center with a performance that can only be described as all-encompassing.

• A special OPB program on the life of Wayne Morse will be previewed for the public at 5 pm Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Knight Law Center Room 110. An earlier showing for students will be at 12:30 pm that day. The program will be broadcast on OPB at 8 pm Tuesday, Feb. 21, as part of the “Oregon Experience” series of documentaries. 

In Afghanistan

• 1,881 U.S. troops killed* (1,880)

• 15,322 U.S. troops wounded in action (15,310)

• 1,095 U.S. contractors killed (1,095)

• $500.9 billion cost of war ($498.8 billion)

• $147.9 million cost to Eugene taxpayers ($147.3 million)

In Iraq

Well, it’s more like beauties, beats, brass and bass when MarchFourth Marching Band (M4) is in town. For those unfamiliar, the Portland-based improv troupe is an experience of ruffled burlesque panties, bass guitar and the sonic blaring of saxophone.

There’s plenty of classical music played around town this month. The Eugene Symphony on Feb. 16 at the Hult performs a couple of popular chestnuts.

Without motor boats, Waldo Lake is serene. With motor boats, it is Fern Ridge Reservoir, but without the convenience of the Shell station and the Dixie Cafe.  

Is I Am Gemini a concept album or a rock opera? “People can call it whatever they feel comfortable calling it,” says Cursive vocalist and primary songwriter Tim Kasher of his group’s upcoming release. 

As far as contemporary hyper-relevance goes, Sazon Booyah is another supernova internet meme, exploding before discovery and peppering pop culture with the remnants.

Today’s musical generation has transcended guitar. There are probably a thousand objectors who could claim this statement is erroneous, but long gone are the days when guitar gods were held at the highest tier of mainstream music.

The Midtown Throwdown III on Feb. 11 showcased Eugene’s mixed-martial arts talent in masse. Local gyms pitted gutsy competitors against each other in fight after fight in what proved to be a gripping series of contests — with each combatant hungry to further propel his nascent career into what has now become the world’s fastest-growing sport. 

NOT WORTH DISCUSSING?

I watched the Feb. 8 proceedings of the Lane County Commissioners, stunned, as three of our elected officials (Jay Bozievich, Sid Leiken, and Faye Stewart) thwarted the efforts of Commissioner Rob Handy to have the board even consider possible salary reductions for county employees earning more than $90,000 a year. 

Aren’t these dire economic times for the county? Why should any area of the budget be immune from discussion?

Robert Young, Eugene

 

VACANT PROMISE

I headed north last week to do Savage Love Live — a rapid-fire, slightly tipsy Q&A session — at the University of Alaska Anchorage. It was my third visit to UAA and it was a blast. All of the questions in this week’s column were submitted to me by UAA students and staffers.


Should I go ahead and divorce my fantastic wife of 23 years now because gay marriage is going to destroy it eventually anyway?  — Tony From Wasilla

If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front cuts from dramatic media footage, including the burning of a $12-million ski resort at Vail, Colo., and the arson at the University of Washington Center for Urban Horticulture, to the streets of New York City, where activist and ecosaboteur Daniel McGowan was living in 2005.

 

In 2007, Dee Rees wrote and directed a short film, Pariah, about a black teen in Brooklyn struggling to come to terms with her identity as a lesbian.

The Oregon Legislature must soon decide to fund or not to fund the construction of a state mental hospital proposed to be sited south of Junction City. That decision will determine the focus of treatment for Oregon’s mentally ill population for years to come. 

To prepare for Valentine’s day EW staffers decided to cleanse

The place looks like a dojo. It is clean, well lit and spartan. No frills. On the front door is a sign that warning not to enter unless they are willing to commit 100 percent to the workout. Inside are signs that say things like, “it’s suppose to be brutal,” “pain is inevitable, suffering is optional,” and, perhaps most foreboding, hanging in the bathroom: “Adapt or perish.”

You know that condescending look people in relationships give single people right before they dispense dating advice? I get that a lot. It’s usually followed by something like, “If you want to find someone, then you need to leave Eugene.”

People glance at themselves in windows, take pictures of themselves, and ask each other, “How do I look?” They scrutinize their bodies through a network of literal and figurative mirrors. In a culture that elevates a narrow vision of physical beauty, it can be hard to love the different realities that are reflected — there is pressure from society to mentally paint bodies over with imperfections, and to sketch in innumerable critiques.

Chemical trespass is what the rural residents of Triangle Lake say they experience when a timber company sprays toxic pesticides that drift onto their properties, often affecting the health of those living there, their gardens and drinking water.

There will be two rallies against chemical trespass on Feb. 11. In Lane County, the rally will start at noon on the shores of Triangle Lake on Highway 36. The other rally starts at 10 am in another heavily sprayed and clearcut area, Lake Selmac, along Highway 199 near Selma in Josephine County.