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Predator advocates are wary of the latest anti-wolf and anti-cougar bills that have been introduced to the current abbreviated session of the Oregon Legislature and call the bills a waste of time and money.

Sally Mackler of Predator Defense says, “This is a session that’s supposed to be focused on the budget and on the economic crisis we are facing. If we had all the time we had spent on the cougar bill we could have fixed the economy by now.”

Audiences still reeling from the Eugene Ballet Company’s Dark Side of the Moon ballet will be thrilled to know that the company is set to perform another riveting homage to some of music’s finest.

In Afghanistan

• 1,880 U.S. troops killed* (1,876)

• 15,310 U.S. troops wounded in action (15,282)

• 1,095 U.S. contractors killed (1,095)

Native or not, every garden is better for plenty of evergreen components, whether for screening purposes or just to keep the garden looking lively through what often feels like a long winter. I’ve written about evergreen native shrubs in previous columns. Here I’d like to focus on evergreen additions to the groundcover layer. 

Before a developer from Alabama came along with a plan to build 300 student apartments, I didn’t even suspect we needed 1,200 more college students living downtown.

It’s refreshing to see a strong woman on stage with a mandolin in her hands. That particular role, typically dominated by male-bodied folk in string bands, is pivotal. The mandolin, usually seen played by women only in its classical guise, defines a great deal of string-band topography — those shrill plucks that carry listeners over musical plateaus to mountain-top exclamations. 

Pretend for a moment that you’re a member of an iconic music crew. You’ve released your seminal work years ago, and prevailing trends have seen the mainstream of your genre devolve from highly educated emcee orators into codeine-guzzling degenerates (here’s lookin’ at you, Wayne).  You don’t want to raise a white flag to the wackness, but you’re not about to give up on your life’s work either. What do you do?

With the contemporary convergence of hip hop and electronica, and the seemingly half-assed “’80s revival” of the last few years, it’s almost fantastical to imagine that groups like The Coup once had the chops to make it in the mainstream.

Eugene resident, LCC student and snowboarded Kyle Richner won a nationally competitive scholarship from Academy Snowboard Company for his ability to mix the fun of snowboarding with school and work.

The folks at Midtown MMA are at it again with their third in a series of mixed martial arts shows, highlighting local fighters and local gyms. Midtown Throwdown III will present a 16-fight card starting at 6 pm Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Lane Events Center. Each match will consists of three three-minute rounds, where fighters may win by way of knockout, submission, technical knockout or decision.

SUPPORT FOR NURSES

I’m one of the five Lane County commissioners. The county and the nurses who work at the county have been trying to negotiate a labor agreement for some time. According to media reports, these negotiations have centered around both wages and benefits, and it’s clear that reducing benefit levels to the nurses will affect their total compensation. I do not support reducing the total compensation levels of Lane County nurses

Any of you ladies out there ever stumble upon an idea for a huge work project while you’re busy folding the never-ending pile of laundry and dinner is boiling over? Next time this happens, take a moment to appreciate being a woman in the 21st century by reflecting on the challenges that confronted Gerty Cori. A pioneer in biochemistry and the first woman to win a Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, Cori had to think and fight for recognition and respect.

John Wayne, Audie Murphy, Tom Berenger, Sylvester Stallone — these were the “war heroes” in the movies I grew up watching. All of them portrayed brazen, fearless, patriotic characters in over-the-top flicks that defined the psyches of many American fighting men in service today, as well as Americans who’ve never seen war but love to watch war movies.

How many times do I get reminded that every year is different from the year before? This year is proving to be a strange one, leap year and politics aside. Momentous times are heralded as we enter the Year of the Water Dragon.

The city of Eugene has yet to participate in the UO’s ultimate “town and gown” collaboration on sustainability, but Springfield has jumped on it with enthusiasm.

 

The UO’s Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP) is getting positive attention from The New York Times and Forbes magazine. Numerous universities around the country, and as far away as China and New Zealand, are interested in replicating what the UO has created, and the program is attracting both students and faculty to UO.

 

Several years ago, entrepreneur Ginger Johnson said to herself, “Self, it’s time to find out what beer is about.” Now, after delving into the intricacies of the beer industry, Johnson owns and operates Women Enjoying Beer, a business that works to help breweries market to the female craft beer enthusiast. Women Enjoying Beer is based in Ashland, but Johnson is excited to appear in Eugene this week for Brew Fest, KLCC’s annual beer-tasting benefit.

 

Images of flooded homes and fields filled the news during the mid-January floods this year. Lane County has been soliciting information from homeowners on how much damage the high waters cost them in order to apply for federal disaster relief funds. So LandWatch Lane County wants to know why the county would consider allowing even more houses in areas prone to flooding. 

 

Conservation groups have been eyeing Congressman Peter DeFazio’s forest trust plan with skepticism. Or rather, they have been eyeing the proposed plan. Part of their distrust of the trust plan is that it doesn’t actually officially exist on paper yet.

 

A ruling related to last week’s verdict that EPD Sgt. Bill Solesbee used excessive force to arrest Josh Schlossberg in 2009 added to Oregon’s existing case law, which recognizes the public’s right to tape police officers and others — in some cases with notification of the videotaped person and in some cases without it. U.S. District Magistrate Judge Thomas Coffin ruled that Solesbee also violated Schlossberg’s rights by searching his camera without a warrant.

 

Kieran Walsh says he’s running for the South Eugene District Lane County Commission position against popular current Commissioner Pete Sorenson “because I just care about my community.”