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It’s not every day that a majority of Eugene’s City Council, Stephen Colbert, Oregon Country Fair and Occupy Eugene have a cause in common. But the far-reaching, unpopular Supreme Court decision on Citizens United has given those concerned about the future of democracy a reason to come together.

Last week the council voted 6-1 to call for a resolution supporting an amendment to the Constitution that would clarify that corporations aren’t people. This week democracy activists are holding People United: More than a March, at 11 am Feb. 25 at the Free Speech Plaza.

Eugene’s Gay/Straight Alliance student leaders will be special guests at a meeting that will discuss equal rights for the gay, lesbian and transgender community in Oregon — and the students are excited about the chance to gain insight from statewide activists.

While the fight rages on against the massive Keystone XL pipeline that would bring tar sands oil from Canada through the U.S. to processing facilities, small groups in the Northwest and the Rockies celebrate a victory in their fight against the machinery that feeds the controversial tar sands.

Hooking up is a pretty basic human need. For some the only criterion for “getting primal” is a warm body and a heartbeat. For others it gets a little bit stickier.  

Anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski said that the primal human needs are food, sex and shelter. But for some, food choices have an effect on their love lives, and we don’t mean that whole garlic breath makes for bad kissing problem.

• What’s up with the R-G’s beef with Commissioner Pete Sorenson? The daily is filling its pages with unrelenting spin trying to sway the public into thinking Lane County’s green and liberal commissioner is somehow both a political mastermind and utterly incompetent. To read the Feb. 18 R-G article about the Democratic Party of Lane County (DPLC) endorsements, you would think Sorenson engineered the whole event just to get a nod from the Dems. And you’d think the reporter who wrote it actually showed up to the event he was writing about. Apparently not. 

Ben Cannon, education advisor to Gov. Kitzhaber, will speak on “Public Education: Oregon’s Commitment To Learning and Equal Opportunity” at City Club of Eugene, 11:50 am Friday, Feb. 24, at the Hilton, lobby level. 

David Wagner, who writes and illustrates the “It’s About Time” column in EW, will be leading a Life Among the Mosses Walk from 1 to 3 pm Saturday, Feb. 25, at Mt. Pisgah Arboretum. Fee is $5. Call 747-3817 for more information. No registration required.

“Ellen passed away.” Even over the phone I could tell my friend was fighting tears. Just the day before, I attended the 10th annual meeting of Lane Independent Living Alliance (LILA). We talked fondly about Ellen Bombero and her role in its tumultuous beginnings.

In Afghanistan

• 1,884 U.S. troops killed* (1,881)

• 15,343 U.S. troops wounded in action (15,322)

• 1,095 U.S. contractors killed (1,095)

• $503.3 billion cost of war ($500.9 billion)

• $148.5 million cost to Eugene taxpayers ($147.9 million)

In Iraq

For those who fiend for the authenticity of Portland’s indie-art aesthetic, the idiosyncrasy of the power duo and the elegance of a classical stringed instrument, Talkdemonic is your Homeric lotus fruit, your Coleridgean Xanadu — with Lisa Molinaro on viola and Kevin O’Connor on drums, loops and laptop (and the occasional avant-banjo thrown in), Talkdemonic comes to Eugene as a complete package.

Dan Jones is the bed-headed poet laureate of Eugene. More of a verbal fix-it man than a lyricist, Jones finds beauty in the ordinary while coaxing poetry from things most writers leave in the garage.

You’re at your first Keller Williams show, not quite knowing what to expect. The stage is littered with guitars, a drum pad, speakers, synths. A regular-looking guy takes the stage and the crowd perks up.

There’s a rich supply of folk music out there, and it’s a vein that Opa Groupa isn’t afraid to tap. The band has formed its own brand of rhythmic, danceable world music.

With the success of the UO women’s Ultimate Frisbee team, Fugue, which won the President’s Day Invitational this past weekend in California, it’s no wonder the sport is enjoying such popularity in Eugene.

“I wanted to do something more with my life … I wanted something that would connect with my heart,” Paul Nicholson says, explaining how a corporate man from New Zealand came to be executive director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

WE DESERVE BETTER

Since when does a ambiguous county law supersede the First Amendment? The hearings officer at the county has made his decision on the mining of Parvin Butte. I think that everyone in the Dexter/Lost Valley area is shocked!

I am a straight 24-year-old female who has known my fiancé since freshman year of college. He has a fetish where he likes to watch women use the bathroom. I knew this, having seen some of his porn early on, and I accepted it. We all have kinks. But while peeing in front of someone isn’t that big of a deal, shitting in front of someone is hard.

The end of the world has been depicted — repeatedly — in movies before. But 2011 wasn’t a time for grand heroics, for world saving and self-sacrifice. Instead, we got existential angst. Maybe that sounds a little grim, and sometimes it was.

Eugene can be a contradictory place. Some find numerous opportunities here, seeing Eugene as a community full of music, culture, good food and outdoor adventure. Others characterize the city more prosaically, as a nice place to live, but maybe a little … lacking in diversions.

Count cartoonist Michael Allred in the former category. “Growing up in Roseburg, Eugene was always the exciting place to go,” he says. Allred, creator of the independent critical-darling comic book Madman, moved on to college in Utah (where he met his wife, comic-book colorist Laura Allred) and eventually lived for a time in Eugene. He later relocated to various points all around the country, and even to Europe. But Eugene always held a special place in his heart.

Every year producers and distributors of biofuel cross their fingers and wonder whether an extension of a federal subsidy of biofuels will pass, and this year they drew the short straw. 

The Federal Excise Tax Credit (FET) on biofuels expired in January. The FET was created in the late 1990s to incentivize the use of biofuels — it provided a wholesale level subsidy on biofuels. Without this funding, the biofuel industry, including the biofuel industry in Oregon, is scrambling to maintain stable prices for its products. 

As Lane County crosses its fingers in hope that Congress will renew federal county funding before massive budget cuts hit county services from the jail to animal control, sparks flew at the Feb. 8 commissioner meeting over proposals to make both real and “symbolic” budget cuts.

Back in 2008 Beyond Toxics (then Oregon Toxics Alliance) did research on the dangers of using toxic pesticides on school grounds. The organization tracked issues such as how many schools had to be evacuated and how many kids were sent home sick from toxic exposures. As a result in 2009 the Oregon Legislature passed a bill that ensures Oregon private and public schools K-12 as well as community colleges must first look to nonchemical means of controlling pests. This new policy starts in July, but schools and government agencies are getting ready for the transition now. 

The shores of Triangle Lake are surrounded by clearcuts that have been sprayed with toxic pesticides. On Saturday, Feb. 11, almost 100 people came out to the rural community to speak out against this chemical trespass, according to pesticide rally participant Day Owen of the Pitchfork Rebellion.

Nothing says love like a good protest. Conveniently enough the most recent State Land Board (SLB) meeting took place on Valentine’s Day and more than 60 protesters showed up in Salem with cards and cakes to let the SLB know that the Cascadia Forest Defenders and other conservationists want state forests to be better mananged.