• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

Articles

The Oregon Legislature must soon decide to fund or not to fund the construction of a state mental hospital proposed to be sited south of Junction City. That decision will determine the focus of treatment for Oregon’s mentally ill population for years to come. 

To prepare for Valentine’s day EW staffers decided to cleanse

The place looks like a dojo. It is clean, well lit and spartan. No frills. On the front door is a sign that warning not to enter unless they are willing to commit 100 percent to the workout. Inside are signs that say things like, “it’s suppose to be brutal,” “pain is inevitable, suffering is optional,” and, perhaps most foreboding, hanging in the bathroom: “Adapt or perish.”

You know that condescending look people in relationships give single people right before they dispense dating advice? I get that a lot. It’s usually followed by something like, “If you want to find someone, then you need to leave Eugene.”

People glance at themselves in windows, take pictures of themselves, and ask each other, “How do I look?” They scrutinize their bodies through a network of literal and figurative mirrors. In a culture that elevates a narrow vision of physical beauty, it can be hard to love the different realities that are reflected — there is pressure from society to mentally paint bodies over with imperfections, and to sketch in innumerable critiques.

Chemical trespass is what the rural residents of Triangle Lake say they experience when a timber company sprays toxic pesticides that drift onto their properties, often affecting the health of those living there, their gardens and drinking water.

There will be two rallies against chemical trespass on Feb. 11. In Lane County, the rally will start at noon on the shores of Triangle Lake on Highway 36. The other rally starts at 10 am in another heavily sprayed and clearcut area, Lake Selmac, along Highway 199 near Selma in Josephine County.

During the wee hours of the morning on Feb. 10, members of Cascadia Forest Defenders used dead Christmas trees to block the driveway of the governor’s mansion in Salem. 

Occupy Eugene is tired of all the talk about the state of America’s health care system and is taking action by treating those in need of medical care for free and connecting them with other community services.

On Sunday, Feb. 5, at the corner of 7th and Pearl, OE organizers set up a medical tent outside the old Federal Building with doctors and nurses available for basic medical treatment, and the group has a long-term plan to continue on every Sunday.

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) doesn’t spread to dogs or humans, yet Sheriff, a stout, short-haired orange tabby with the disease, is waiting at West Coast Dog and Cat Rescue (WCDC) for a home, most likely because people fear he is contagious. This Valentine’s Day weekend WCDC hopes that will change.

• Western Lane County: Little Lake Logging, Jeffrey Newman (927-3339 and 927-3384) plans to spray Garlon 4 Ultra and Tordon in sections 17 and 18 of Township 16S Range 07W and Section 13 of Township 16S Range 08W in the Coast Range on Little Lake Stream near Triangle Lake. Notices 2011-781-00468C and 2011-781-00469C.

Oregon’s diminishing coffers have put many social services at risk, and Employment Related Day Care (ERDC) is no exception. Money has been set aside for the program, but advocates fear it will get lost in the budget fray.

ERDC subsidizes the day care costs of low-income families using a formula that accounts for income and child care costs in a family’s zip code. The income ceiling for a family of four is $40,800 a year.

Many plants rely on honeybees to pollinate them and facilitate reproduction, but colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is killing about one-third of bee colonies per year nationally, is making it much harder for bees to get their buzz on. 

Predator advocates are wary of the latest anti-wolf and anti-cougar bills that have been introduced to the current abbreviated session of the Oregon Legislature and call the bills a waste of time and money.

Sally Mackler of Predator Defense says, “This is a session that’s supposed to be focused on the budget and on the economic crisis we are facing. If we had all the time we had spent on the cougar bill we could have fixed the economy by now.”

Audiences still reeling from the Eugene Ballet Company’s Dark Side of the Moon ballet will be thrilled to know that the company is set to perform another riveting homage to some of music’s finest.

In Afghanistan

• 1,880 U.S. troops killed* (1,876)

• 15,310 U.S. troops wounded in action (15,282)

• 1,095 U.S. contractors killed (1,095)

Native or not, every garden is better for plenty of evergreen components, whether for screening purposes or just to keep the garden looking lively through what often feels like a long winter. I’ve written about evergreen native shrubs in previous columns. Here I’d like to focus on evergreen additions to the groundcover layer. 

Before a developer from Alabama came along with a plan to build 300 student apartments, I didn’t even suspect we needed 1,200 more college students living downtown.

It’s refreshing to see a strong woman on stage with a mandolin in her hands. That particular role, typically dominated by male-bodied folk in string bands, is pivotal. The mandolin, usually seen played by women only in its classical guise, defines a great deal of string-band topography — those shrill plucks that carry listeners over musical plateaus to mountain-top exclamations. 

Pretend for a moment that you’re a member of an iconic music crew. You’ve released your seminal work years ago, and prevailing trends have seen the mainstream of your genre devolve from highly educated emcee orators into codeine-guzzling degenerates (here’s lookin’ at you, Wayne).  You don’t want to raise a white flag to the wackness, but you’re not about to give up on your life’s work either. What do you do?

With the contemporary convergence of hip hop and electronica, and the seemingly half-assed “’80s revival” of the last few years, it’s almost fantastical to imagine that groups like The Coup once had the chops to make it in the mainstream.

Eugene resident, LCC student and snowboarded Kyle Richner won a nationally competitive scholarship from Academy Snowboard Company for his ability to mix the fun of snowboarding with school and work.