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Bacon of the Sea!

This just in from Oregon State University: Seaweed that tastes like bacon. 

According to an OSU press release

Oregon State University researchers have patented a new strain of a succulent red marine algae called dulse that grows extraordinarily quickly, is packed full of protein and has an unusual trait when it is cooked.

This seaweed tastes like bacon.

Dulse ( Palmaria sp.) grows in the wild along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. It is harvested and usually sold for up to $90 a pound in dried form as a cooking ingredient or nutritional supplement. But researcher Chris Langdon and colleagues at OSU’s have created and patented a new strain of dulse – one he has been growing for the past 15 years.

 The seaweed was originally developed as a "superfood" for abalone shellfish, according to Langdon. "His strain, which looks like translucent red lettuce, is an excellent source of minerals, vitamins and antioxidants – and it contains up to 16 percent protein in dry weight," OSU says.

The press release (which for some reason compares bacon-flavored seaweed to discovering a unicorn) goes on to say that Langdon’s change in perspective about what dulse could be useful for was triggered by a visit by Chuck Toombs, a faculty member in OSU’s College of Business.

Toombs "stopped by Langdon’s office because he was looking for potential projects for his business students. He saw the dulse growing in bubbling containers outside of Langdon’s office and the proverbial light went on. 'Dulse is a super-food, with twice the nutritional value of kale,' Toombs said. 'And OSU had developed this variety that can be farmed, with the potential for a new industry for Oregon.'"

The press release goes on to say it sees the vegan market as a "niche" for dulse and that "Several Portland-area chefs are now testing dulse as a fresh product and many believe it has significant potential in both its raw form and as a food ingredient."

For the full, detailed, press release and a link to an article in Oregon Agricultural Progress, go here.