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September 20, 2012 02:35 PM

September 20, 2012 09:56 AM

Hundreds of patients who rely on medical marijuana, and their supporters, will hold rallies today (Sept. 20) at Obama campaign offices and elsewhere in at least 15 cities in eight states across the country. In Eugene the rally will be at noon in front of the U.S. Courthouse at 405 E. 8th Ave.

 

The rallies are “an effort to draw attention to the Obama administration's aggressive efforts to shut down legal medical marijuana grow sites and dispensaries, obstructing the passage of laws that would regulate such activity,” according to organizers who include Jim Greig locally. A rally is planned today at the nation's Capitol, and  demonstrations organized by Americans for Safe Access (ASA) are planned in the Arizona, California, Colorado, Montana, Missouri, New Mexico, Oregon and Washington.

 

Greig can be contacted by phone at 654-0011.

September 20, 2012 10:11 AM

The push to treat marijuana like alcohol is getting a lot of attention. And no visual aid works as well as a Big Green Pot Superhero:

 

The brief Oregon part starts at 1:44.

September 19, 2012 10:59 AM

Former Oregon Secretary of State Bill Bradbury has officially endorsed Measure 80 on the November ballot that would replace Oregon’s system of marijuana prohibition with a taxation-and-regulation model that would allow adults 21 and older to purchase cannabis at state-licensed stores only.

 


"Our nation’s war on drugs has really been, for decades now, a war on Americans of color and our poorest, most vulnerable citizens, and the ban on agricultural hemp has been the collateral damage," says Bradbury in a press release Sept. 19 from Roy Kaufmann at Yes on 80.

 

Bradbury served 14 years in the Oregon Legislature before serving two terms as Oregon’s secretary of state. "I urge my fellow Oregonians to vote yes on Measure 80, which is an historic opportunity to show our fellow Americans a way to end the failed drug war, begin a new, sensible approach to marijuana, and restore hemp to our farmers and hi-tech entrepreneurs for biofuel, textiles, and advanced manufacturing,” he says.

 

Oregon is already among the nation’s biggest importers of hemp. But, under the current set of marijuana and hemp laws, hemp-product companies in Oregon are forced to import their raw hemp oil and fiber from countries like China, which makes those Oregon-made products less cost-competitive, says Kaufmann. Measure 80 would allow Oregon farmers to grow hemp to be sold to Oregon’s hemp food, biofuel, and textile companies, which would keep money in our economy and create many living-wage jobs around the state.

 



“When we repeal marijuana prohibition, we remove the number one barrier to re-introducing agricultural hemp into our sustainable economy,” says Yes on 80 chief petitioner Paul Stanford. “With one simple act of voting yes on 80, Oregon voters can end the drug war, regulate marijuana responsibly, and restore hemp for farmers and small business.” 



 

To learn more about Measure 80, visit www.vote80.org or http://octa2012.org

September 19, 2012 04:39 PM

Stephen King announced on his website today that the sequel to The Shining will be released Sept. 24, 2013. King will bring the child character, Danny Torrence (the Esp-gifted/cursed kid who bikes around the Overlook Hotel), back to life in Doctor Sleep, as a middle-aged hospice employee who finds his supernatural powers still come in handy. Here's to 36 years in the making!

September 19, 2012 01:16 PM

The bus driver is cool. It has big windwows. It is big and long. It has it's own lane. Sound familiar? It's the bus.

LTD needs to add a little Danish sensibility to its ads. If Our Money Our Transit can put anti-EmX ads on the back of LTD buses, then LTD should think about hitting back with hot, sexy bus ads. 

September 19, 2012 04:05 PM

Tonight at 5 pm, ODOT is holding a Oregon Passenger Rail project open house at the Atrium Building, 99 W 10th Ave, to talk about the possibility of high-speed rail between Portland and Eugene. For more information, check out www.oregonpassengerrail.org

September 17, 2012 01:03 PM

EDITOR'S NOTE: Looks like there have been some delays. He is expected to hold a press conference at 9 am Wednesday at the Lane County Elections Office, 275 W. 10th Ave. in Eugene. Not sure about his Corvallis plans at this point. Call (916) 320-6430 for updates.

 

Seth Woolley of Portland is in Newport today and will be making a Corvallis stop in his statewide campaign bike tour at about noon Tuesday, Sept. 18, at the Pacific Green Party’s campaign office at SE 3rd St. and Bridgeway Avenue. The public is invited to attend.

 

Woolley, the Pacific Green Party's candidate for secretary of state, is intending to visit every county in Oregon to meet with voters, elected officials, and the press in the course of the 30-day journey. He expects his trip from Newport to take about four hours.

 

Woolley is campaigning on a platform that seeks to promote healthier native forests, real election reform, and better, transparent auditing.

 

More information on his candidacy is available at the his website, http://seth4sos.org/ or email mikevanh@comcast.net

September 17, 2012 05:55 PM

The Leadman Triathalon is Saturday, Sept. 22, in Bend.

See www.leadmantri.com for more information. Meanwhile, enjoy the video. Great scenery.

September 14, 2012 02:58 PM

With all the energy Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros brought to the McDonald Theatre Sept. 12, it’s a wonder the place didn’t burst into flames. The 12-member act kept the audience electrified until the last note, letting the audience pick songs when the Zeros finished their set list and the McDonald stage was still theirs for a moment. Alex Ebert and Jade Castrinos shared some great chemistry together as artists and with the audience, and the tightness of the ensemble’s individual players live — not just in the studio — was a feat with so many instruments. — Shannon Finnell

Photos by Todd Cooper

September 14, 2012 02:14 PM

(This information provided by Chris Crabb, crabbsoup@comcast.net)

Obo Addy — master drummer, award-winning composer, brilliant musician, and skilled teacher — passed away peacefully at 4 pm Sept. 13 surrounded by family and friends. He had been battling liver cancer since 2007. Addy was 76 years old.

 

A public memorial is being planned, and will be announced at a later date. HIs family is directing his fans and friends to CaringBridge (www.caringbridge.org/visit/oboaddy) to leave messages, photos and memories, which will be shared with Addy’s family (note: a free account must be set up to access the site). The family has also set up a page on www.indiegogo.com/oboaddy to help raise funds for costs related to his illness and funeral expenses.

 

Addy played music to the very end, joining with family, friends and musicians from throughout his life for a few last jam sessions in his final days. He passed away with music filling his ears.

 

Born Jan, 15, 1936 in Accra, the capital of Ghana, Addy was one of 55 children of Jacob Kpani Addy, a medicine man who integrated rhythmic music into healing and other rituals. Addy was designated by his tribe as a master drummer by the age of 6.

 

Addy's earliest musical influence was the traditional music of the Ga people, but he was also influenced as an adolescent by popular music from Europe and the U.S. He got his professional start in Ghana by playing with the Joe Kelly Band, the Ghana Broadcasting Band, and the Farmer’s Council Band, which played popular American and European music and the dance music of Ghana known as highlife.

 

The Arts Council of Ghana as a Ga master hired Addy in 1969, and he received his first international exposure at the Munich Summer Olympics in 1972. He then move to London and spent six years touring internationally until 1978, when he relocated to Portland. There he met and married his wife, Susan, who began managing his musical career.

 

A vigorous supporter of world music, Addy was extremely active in bringing that style of music to Portland and Oregon. He maintained two different ensembles: Okropong, which shares traditional instrumentation, using hand and stick drums, bells, and shakers to create a layered rhythmic effect; and Kukrudu, an eight-piece African jazz group that relies on a mix of European and African instruments.

 

Through numerous in-school residencies, performances and workshops, Addy affected hundreds of thousands of lives in the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

 

Addy’s charismatic spirit, rapid-fire hands, and powerful voice led him to receive the National Heritage Fellowship Award from the National Endowment for the Arts under President Bill Clinton, the Governors Award for the Arts in Oregon, The Masters Fellowship from the Regional Arts and Culture Council and the Masters Fellowship from the Oregon Arts Commission.

 

He was a member of the faculty at Lewis & Clark College, and the artistic director of the Obo Addy Legacy Project, formerly known as the Homowo African Arts and Cultures, a not-for-profit organization founded by the Addys in 1986 as a virtual cultural center with offerings in schools, parks, community centers and performance venues all over the country. The organization put on an annual Homowo Festival in Portland for nearly 15 years with music and dance, food, vendors and art demonstrations from various countries within the continent of Africa and the African Diaspora.

 

Addy leaves behind his wife, Susan; children, Alex Addy, Brenda Addy, Akuyea Anupa Addy, Akuyea Bibio Addy, Akuyea Regina Addy and Kordai Addy; stepdaughter Debbe Hamada (Bill Andrews) and stepson Dan Hamada (Judy); brothers Yacub Addy, Oko Thompson, Ismaila Addy and Mustapha Tettey Addy; and nine grandchildren.

 

For more information, visit www.oboaddylegacyproject.org.

September 14, 2012 02:10 PM

City Council will certainly get an earful Monday night. The 7:30 pm public hearing schedule at the downtown library Bascom-Tyson room includes these three topics:

  1. Ordinance on bikes on sidewalks in the downtown core
  2. Ordinance on the Downtown Public Safety Zone
  3. Ordinance on a plastic bag ban

This oughtta be good!

September 14, 2012 11:37 AM

The Triangle Lake/Hwy 36 pesticide sprays were featured on PBS's NewsHour this week. 

The people around Triangle Lake have been fighting the timber industry over toxic sprays for years. Companies such as Roseburg, Weyerhaeuser and Seneca Jones say they have the right to spray on their private lands, and that the sprays are necessary to regrow the clearcut forests for future wood products.

Residents say the toxic sprays are getting in their water, onto their organic farms and even into their own bodies.

Triangle Lake residents, including children, have tested postive for forestry pesticides in their urine. Here's just some of the coverage we've featured in the paper, to give you a sense of the history. From schools surrounded by clearcuts to Homeland Security targeting pesticide protesters, it's a twisted tale.

March 2006: The Pitchfork Rebellion against the toxic sprays arises. Story by Kera Abraham.

February 2008: Small Town, Big Clearcut: Parents fight a pesticide spray after Weyerhaeuser clearcuts around Triangle Lake school. Story by Camilla Mortensen.

June 2008: Homeland Security keeps tabs on pestcide activtists. Activists pepper sprayed at rally.

May 2011: Testing shows pesticides in school's waterMarch 2012: Problems with the state spray study arise.

September 2012: Fall spray season begins, but the study remains in limbo.

Want more? Go to the Eugene Weekly website and Google "spray schedule" to see the years and years worth of pesticide spray alerts that Forestland Dwellers has sent EW to publish. Search for "Triangle Lake" to get all the articles on the fight against the sprays in Oregon's Coast Range.