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April 2, 2015 04:07 PM

On Tuesday, April 7, oral arguments will be heard in court about a climate change lawsuit brought by local youth, which argues that Oregon "is failing to meet its carbon emission reduction goals and is not acting to protect Oregon’s public trust resources and the futures of these young Oregonians."

The full press release is below and some opportunities for activism from 350 Eugene are:

2:00 Children’s Tribunal, featuring Oregon youth and Mayor Kitty Piercy  Students / youth "testify" during Children's Tribunal, saying to "judges" [the crowd!] what they want to protect. 

2:00 – on Selfie Stations: Participants make photo petitions to Governor Kate, asking her to work with--not against--Oregon’s youth plaintiffs and protect the climate for Oregonians. We’ll tweet photos to her. Postcards available to decorate and send.

2:30 – 3:30 Silent Vigil HELP US ENCIRCLE THE COURTHOUSE:  Everyone invited to join circle of silence to honor the significance of this case; our fervent hope that judge takes right action; and to dramatize the silence to come for all living things if we don’t protect the climate. Our circle symbolically protects what’s happening inside—a potent bid for environmental justice.

People hold signs depicting everything at stake.

PLEASE bring poster / sign / photo / depicting something or someone you love and want to protect in Oregon. Or dress up as that thing without a voice (as otter / cloud / flower / river / democracy, etc).
We will hold these posters during our silent vigil. 

When hearing ends (estimated at 3:30):  Julia Olson, OCT Executive Director reports on proceedings

Press release from Our Children's Trust:

Oral Arguments for Youth’s Landmark Climate Change Lawsuit Held in Eugene at Lane County Circuit Court 


WHAT: Two Eugene youths’ climate change case, Chernaik v. Brown, will be argued before Judge Karsten Rasmussen and in front of national news media at Lane County Circuit Court. Oregonians from across the state are coming to support these young women in their fight for state action on climate change. Supporters will also be participating in a special climate change tribunal and silent vigil, organized by the 350 Eugene chapter, outside the courthouse. 

WHEN: Tuesday, April 7, 2015, Court hearing begins at 2:30 p.m. PST 

WHERE: Lane County Circuit Court, 125 East 8th Avenue, Eugene, Oregon 97401

WHY: Kelsey and Olivia brought their case against Gov. Kitzhaber (now Gov. Brown) and the state of Oregon because the state, by its own admission, is failing to meet its carbon emission reduction goals and is not acting to protect Oregon’s public trust resources and the futures of these young Oregonians. The youths ask the court for a declaration of law that the state has a fiduciary obligation to manage the atmosphere, water resources, coastal areas, wildlife and fish as public trust assets and to protect them from substantial impairment resulting from the emissions of greenhouse gases in Oregon and the resulting adverse effects of climate change and ocean acidification. In its initial motion in the case filed in January, the state renounced any obligation to protect these public resources, arguing that the public trust doctrine only prevents the state from selling off submerged lands to private interests. Kelsey and Olivia’s lawyers say that the governor is flat wrong in her defense of the case.  

Last summer, in a nationally significant decision in their case, the Oregon Court of Appeals ruled the circuit court must decide whether the atmosphere is a public trust resource that the state of Oregon has a duty to protect. Kelsey and Olivia were initially told by Judge Rasmussen that they could not bring the case, but the Court of Appeals overturned that decision, and Kelsey and Olivia will have their case heard in Lane County Circuit Court once again.

Kelsey and Olivia are represented by Crag Law Center, Liam Sherlock at Hutchinson, Cox, Coons, Orr & Sherlock, P.C. and the Western Environmental Law Center. Kelsey and Olivia’s lawsuit was filed with the help of Our Children’s Trust, an Oregon-based nonprofit orchestrating a global game-changing, youth-driven legal campaign to establish the right to a healthy atmosphere and stable climate. The legal effort advances the fundamental duty of government today: to address the climate crisis based on scientific baselines and benchmarks, and to do so within timeframes determined by scientific analysis. 

Short documentary films of Kelsey and other young people taking legal action can be seen at www.ourchildrenstrust.org/trust-films

Our Children's Trust is a nonprofit organization advocating for urgent emissions reductions on behalf of youth and future generations, who have the most to lose if emissions are not reduced. OCT is spearheading the international human rights and environmental TRUST Campaign to compel governments to safeguard the atmosphere as a "public trust" resource. We use law, film, and media to elevate their compelling voices. Our ultimate goal is for governments to adopt and implement enforceable science-based Climate Recovery Plans with annual emissions reductions to return to an atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration of 350 ppm. www.ourchildrenstrust.org/

March 31, 2015 04:11 PM

The Eugene Police Department would like your help catching a cat burglar whose exploits were caught on a cat cam.

More precisely, EPD is seeking an armed robber who broke into a house near the University of Oregon. The robber was filmed by a camera set up by a cat sitter to record the cats he was caring for while the owners were away. 

In the first video, if you look fast, you will see one of the kitties in question, as well as the burglar. In the second you just see the guy turning off the camera. If you can ID the robber, the Eugene police would like you to give them a call at 541.682.5573

(The full press release is below.)


Video one

Kitty (not a suspect)

Actual suspect


Video two (aka dude turns off the camera)

Here is the full (short) press release from EPD:

Detectives looking for information in Burglary (Video footage)

Last week, Property Crimes detectives received information and video of a burglary that happened on Sunset Drive, near the University of Oregon campus, directly to the east. The incident happened on the second story of a two-level residence and was captured on video, after a person house-sitting for the owner set-up a camera to watch the cats while the owners were away.



If anyone has information about the armed suspect in this video, please contact detectives at 541.682.5573

Update: Can you still call them cat burglars if they aren't stealth? They have arrested two people in connection with the crime. 

March 26, 2015 12:33 PM
It's spring break; the weather is great and half of Oregon is on vacation (since apparently every school in the state has the same break). The University of Oregon seems to be celebrating by getting rid of staff that either release records OR object to the release of records.
The R-G reports that the UO has apparently not only rid itself of the archivists who released records from the presidential archives to a UO professor who requested them, but also this break week fired one of the school's counseling center employees who "letter criticizing the university for accessing an 18-year-old student’s therapy records."
According to the R-G in the case of the archivsts and the document release:
The document trove — which the university eventually recovered — contained emails, reports and other papers of four former presidents, university sources said.
That would be the records of Michael Gottfredson, who resigned in August; Bob Berdahl, who served as interim president; Richard Lariviere, who was fired in 2011; and the late Dave Frohnmayer, who retired in 2009.
Citing the confidentiality of personnel decisions, Klinger declined to elaborate on the archivists’ departure from their jobs.
The archivists, James Fox and Kira Homo, could not be reached for comment. They have been on administrative leave since the administration discovered the release of the documents.
Meanwhile, the therapist announced her dismissal via email, the R-G writes:
Karen Stokes, former executive assistant to the director of the counseling center, announced her dismissal in an e-mail broadcast to counseling center staff today.
Stokes and senior staff therapist Jennifer Morlok alleged in February that the university interfered with the student’s care and took the student’s private medical records — to prepare for litigation — without the student’s permission.
In Thursday’s e-mail, Stokes wrote: “I am disappointed that the UO has chosen this course of action. I, along with Jenny, had hoped that our letter of concern regarding the medical records that we believe were unethically and illegally disclosed would promote positive changes.
“Instead of taking our concerns to heart and recognizing the courage it took to come forward with such concerns, the UO appears to be more concerned about defending itself and attacking those who brought the ethical and legal concerns to light,” Stokes wrote.
No updates on any of this on the UO's media relations page.  However, Economics Prof. Bill Harbaugh, who was the faculty member who requested the presidential records has some updates on his UOMatters.com site, as well as his letter to the library committee on the issue:
Subject: “The Incident”
From: Bill Harbaugh
Date: March 18, 2015 at 12:18:48 AM EDT
To: Adriene Lim <alim@uoregon.edu>
Dear Dean Lim, Associate Dean Bonamici, and members of the Library Committee -
Thank you for allowing me to attend your meeting today.
At the meeting Andrew Bonamici said that, in the interests of balancing confidentiality and public access, and the impossibility of inspecting every document individually, that the UO archives had policies or procedures for allowing researchers access to files and folders from the archives that had not been fully reviewed for confidentiality. This access was conditional on researchers agreeing not to make confidential documents public. (This is not verbatim, it’s my recollection of the gist of what Andrew said.)
I don’t know what you’ve been told about how I got the digital Presidential Archives, but there was nothing nefarious about it. I sent the special collections reference desk a request for information on how to access the digital archives. I was told that the digital archives might contain confidential documents protected by FERPA or other laws, and that if I agreed not to release those documents, I should send in a usb key and I would get the archives.
[Here’s the disclaimer language: Archival material may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal and/or state right to privacy laws and other regulations.
Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g. a cause of action for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual’s private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of Oregon assumes no responsibility.]
I agreed to this condition. I sent in the usb key. I got the documents back. I kept the confidential documents confidential, as I had promised.
It strikes me that this is exactly the procedure that Andrew explained today should have been followed by the archives. It was followed.
So, what is this controversy all about? I only posted two documents. No one has made a credible case for either being confidential. One, of course, was very embarrassing to the General Counsel’s office, and, in my opinion, that’s why the UO administration went after me, and the archivists.
Bill Harbaugh
UO Prof of Economics
March 4, 2015 01:16 PM

So the UO cheerleaders went to Nike and gave Phil Knight a birthday cheer. 

Mr.Knight we're here to cheer you, on your very special day.

We appreciate your kindness, there's no way we can repay.

One request from all of us students, can you put us in your will?

So a great big Happy Birthday, to our favorite Uncle Phil!


Maybe I'm creeped out because it's a bit like the UO gave "Uncle Phil" a bunch of young women for his birthday? 

Watch the whole video below.

According to Comcast SportsNet:

Members of the UO cheer team were invited to Nike campus in Portland, Oregon to perform for a Nike sales meeting the morning of Mr. Knights [sic] Birthday.

The cheerleaders performance was accompanied with variety of lead entertainers in industry such as dancers, circus performers, and choreographers. The performance ended in a spectacular show ending atmosphere with balloons falling from the ceiling, streamers strung across the stage, and beach balls tossed into the crowd.

February 27, 2015 02:01 PM

The UO has dropped its countersuit against the student who says three UO basketball players raped her. According to the R-G, interim President Scott Coltrane said, "that the UO heard from 'many different people on campus, and we really wanted to get away from this distraction.'” 

A petition calling for the UO to drop the suit garnered more than 2,000 signatures in less than a week.

The court document, available here, says that the university is no longer countering the victim’s lawsuit and is not asking the student, or her attorneys, to pay for the UO's attorney fees and costs related to the case.

In response to the UO's amended response filed in U.S. District Court in Eugene, UO professor John Bonine, Jennifer Freyd and Carol Stabile sent a letter to Coltrane, taking him to task for victim blaming  and using language claiming "the survivor's lawsuit will hurt other survivors."

Dear Scott,

We appreciate the steps you took in getting the counter claim dropped. It has already had disastrous consequences on the University community.

But while the University has dropped the counterclaim, its amended response kept some of the worst language. Paragraph 102 of UO’s new response still retains some of the most victim-blaming language, namely the language claiming that the survivor’s lawsuit harms other survivors.

In addition paragraph 102 continues to include the original response’s claim that the lawsuit will “convey” a message to the public in order to “demonstrate the high priority Oregon gives to Title IX.” Someone has confused a legal filing with a press release.

A response to the court is no place for public relations talk about the University’s supposed devotion to women and Title IX. It is a place to admit or deny factual allegations. The University cannot claim that it is devoted to survivors while at the same time saying that a survivor’s use of legal remedies will chill reporting by others.

John, Jennifer, and Carol 

February 26, 2015 05:47 PM

From the people who brought you "Snip City" for March Madness (the Oregon Urology Institute) comes:


Because you may as well have an excuse to lay on the sofa and watch basketball.

Bonus, vasectomies = fewer babies, which is better for the planet. Just ask the Center for Biological Diversity about their "endangered species condoms."

February 24, 2015 03:31 PM

Social media posts about "Hope," a dog animal advocates say was starving and dehydrated, led to a KEZI story and then to a response from the Eugene Police Department. Hope the dog, whose name is actually Zena, according to EPD, has since been put to sleep by her owner.

Animal advocates including Tamara Barnes of No Kill Lane County have complained about the way the case has been handled by animal services as well as about Lane County's policy of not filing criminal charges in animal neglect cases. A petition has been started at Change.org and a Facebook page, Justice for Hope, give details on the issue.

The KEZI story, which can be read or watched in its entirety here, starts off:

A group of local animal lovers say they saved a dog Friday after a friend saw the animal emaciated in the backyard of a home.

Gail Kiefer says when she got the call about the dog, now called Hope, she went to the house near the intersection of Bertelsen and Elmira, called animal control, and tried to track down the owner.

No one was home so she went into the backyard, took the dog, and rushed it to the Four Corners Vet Clinic where the dog got food, fluids, and medication.

The vet says he’s never seen anything like this. Kiefer says while she knows she could get in trouble for taking the dog, she couldn’t leave the dog to suffer.

The KEZI story led to a response from EPD, which talked to Zena's owner who said the elderly dog with heart disease had lost "a significant amount of weight" over the last year "but still seemed happy." That release is below.

News Release

February 24, 2015

Animal Welfare Case Information

After a local media report about a dog who was reported to possibly be neglected, there have been people concerned about the dog. Eugene Animal Welfare would like to clarify information about the dog and its situation.

On February 3 - there was a single report of a young dog that was possibly the victim of animal neglect in the Bethel area. Animal Welfare attempted to follow up on the original report five times between February 8 and February 18. An animal welfare officer went to the home on February 8, February 9, February 11, and February 15  and February 18. On February 15, the animal welfare officer took a police officer with him, and on another visit he asked roofers nearby if they could spot the dog in the backyard. They were unable to see the dog. Police officers and animal welfare officers are not legally permitted to enter private premises without probable cause, consent or a warrant.

On February 20,  a woman broke into the yard and stole the dog. She tried to leave the dog, Zena, at 1st Avenue Shelter, which can’t take dogs that have been removed from their owners without permission. Shelter staff provided water for the dog and instructed the woman to wait for Animal Welfare to respond to. The woman left the shelter with Zena prior to the arrival of the animal welfare officer and took her to a veterinarian in Santa Clara. The veterinarian also could not take the dog under that type of circumstance. The woman then called a third party, who had her take it take it to the vet at Four Corners. That third party  took the dog home after it was treated.

On February 22, Zena’s worried owner reported her stolen.  The owner had been away from home and had a dog sitter caring for the animal, which may account for not being able to get ahold of him.  A police officer was able to track the dog down and took it to an emergency vet for treatment. The veterinarian kept the dog overnight. According to the emergency vet, Zena is a 17-year-old, geriatric dog with cardiac disease and a heart murmur. Cardiac disease causes chronic wasting. According to the emergency veterinarian, who last checked the dog, she was in relatively good condition, despite her age, blindness and heart disease.

An investigation showed the owner had Zena on a healthy diet to try to put weight on and kept her mostly inside the house. The owner has had Zena since she was a puppy. He told police that over the past year, she has lost a significant amount of weight but that she still seemed happy. Yesterday, the owner made the difficult decision to humanely euthanize his well-loved pet.  

This is a difficult case to investigate as it involves people with good intentions who felt they were doing the right thing, but did not have all the information.    The pet owner was faced with difficult end-of-life decisions for his pet of 17 years. 


No Kill Lane County's response to the EPD release and updates are on the Facebook page. 

February 23, 2015 12:05 PM

As of  noon Monday, Feb. 23, a petition to UO trustees entitled "Stop suing rape survivors University of Oregon" has garnered more than 500 signatures. The Change.org petition is in response to the UO and basketball coach Dana Altman's counter-suit against an alleged rape victim.* According to The Oregonian, "Oregon and Altman's suit seeks to have the original 'frivolous, unreasonable' complaint' dismissed and recover legal fees from either the alleged victim or her attorneys."

The petition, which was started two days ago, reads:

The University of Oregon has become the first institution in higher education to sue a rape survivor pursuing her rights under Title IX of the Civil Rights Act -- all after violating medical privacy laws by seizing her counseling records from the campus health center, and asking campus counselors to give her substandard care.

Send the UO a message: suing rape survivors will not make campus safer for the 1 in 5 women who will be sexually assaulted, harassed, or raped each year on campus.

The petition provides links to both The Oregonian's story and to an R-G story detailing an email from a UO therapist who alleges she was told to alter counseling care for the student and that the "student’s clinical records were accessed without her knowledge, without the student’s permission and without any court authorization."

Names of those listed as having signed include those of UO faculty, graduate students, alumni and undergrads.


* EW uses the word alleged not to indicate doubt in a rape victim's story but for legal reasons to indicate that the accusations have not been proven in a court of law.

Update: the UO has dropped the suit.

February 23, 2015 02:11 PM

We all make mistakes, but The Register-Guard wins typo of the week with this one in the article "Final Frontier" from the Feb. 21 issue:

“'Microgreens will be the first cash flow boost,' Jason Waligoske said. 'That will be followed by mescaline, baby spinach, other greens."

In the print version, it appears after the jump under "Unusual varieties planned."

Indeed I would find it "unusual," and in fact a little trippy, if I were to find mescaline in my salad rather than mesclun mix.

The story continues, "'My wife is from Germany,' Jason Waligoske said. 'Some of that outlook is her desire for produce that is over there that is hardly ever seen here.'”

Recreational pot has been legalized in Oregon, so why deny fans of fresh hallucinogens and hard-to-find produce a little peyote-type snack to munch with their microgreens?

February 12, 2015 10:30 AM

The ongoing battle between car sharing service Uber and the city of Eugene has taken to social media. Let the Twitter wars begin!

Uber has launched an online petition asking Eugene to back down on its stance that the ride service must obtain the same $400 permits local taxi companies have. It is using the hashtag #EugeneNeedsUber.

Eugene is responding with #EugeneDeservesSafety and tweeted back at the petition that Uber could "Or you could just agree to City driver checks, insurance reqs, & car safety checks. Not hard."

Snark from a city Twitter feed? #winning.


In the R-G's story today, which also gives some background on the Uber-dispute over the regulations, it says the city did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the petition, but the city is commenting now. 

The city responded to the criticism that Eugene's "old regs" are a "big problem" with " Actually, updated code for apps & offered to do more once Uber agrees to safety reqs - driver checks, insurance, & car checks."


We're hoping the city keeps tagging us on its responses throughout the day. You can follow the tweets at the city's feed here.

February 12, 2015 05:06 PM

Update: Kitzhaber has resigned and Oregon has the nation's first openly bisexual governor.

Portland media has been having a field day (or rather field month or two) with Gov. John Kitzhaber's troubles and the back and forth question of whether he plans to step down or not. Now, as the story gets weirder, it's gone national with the New York Times, Christian Science Monitor and the Washington Post, among others, tracking Oregon's non-lethal version of OJ Simpson's slowspeed chase down the freeway. 

Here's the WaPo's summary of what it calls "The Long, Bizarre — and Dumbfounding — Saga of Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber."

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber (D) had decided to resign his office Tuesday over continuing questions about his fiancee's actions as a consultant, according to the Oregonian. Then, on Wednesday, he reportedly changed his mind.

The governor is pretty clearly holding onto his career by a thread. As summarized over on GovBeat, first lady Cylvia Hayes was guiding state employees on the implementation of a new policy even as she was doing private consulting work for a group pushing the same policy. The story has taken several turns, most recently with the Oregonian, the state's largest newspaper, calling on Kitzhaber to resign. A recall effort has also been launched, as has a criminal investigation by the state attorney general. And tangentially, there's that whole matter from last year about Hayes havingmarried an 18-year-old Ethiopian to secure a green card for him in exchange for $5,000. She neglected to inform the governor of this before the media unearthed it.

In its article, "Love and Politics Collide as Scandals Plague Oregon’s Fourth-Term Governor," the NYT kicks off with more on the enviro aspect of the Hayes saga and the fact Kitzhaber is a long-term governor:

The inquiries stem from contracting work that Ms. Hayes, 47, a clean-energy consultant, performed and was paid for while living with the governor and advising him on clean-energy issues. Those issues have long been a priority of Mr. Kitzhaber’s administration, but now they are bound up in, and perhaps undermined by, questions of whether love and politics got too cozy in the governor’s mansion.

But the deeper trouble is that after 12 years in office, the governor’s enemies and critics — and erstwhile supporters, who think he has simply stayed in office too long — have grown like compound interest over everything from his laid-back management style to the disastrous rollout of the state health insurance website, which never fully worked and cost hundreds of millions of dollars.


Today's latest was the news that Secretary of State Kate Brown — who would take the governor's seat should Kitz step down — was rushing back from Washington DC, leading politcos to speculate he was ready to leave. Before her plane landed, Kitzhaber announced he was in fact not stepping down.

Here is Brown's press release in response and you can hear more about it via KLCC.

As the Christian Science Monitor reports, fellow Dems such as state Treasurer Ted Wheeler are calling for Kitz to step down. 

Willamette Week, which broke the Hayes saga originally, is now saying Kitzhaber's office sought to destroy thousands of documents.

The Oregonian, which has been birddogging the issue as well is now providing live updates. 

Anyone taking bets on which late night and news-satire or commentary shows Oregon will be on tonight? This almost beats the attack owls.

January 2, 2015 02:19 PM

The Fellowship of Christian Athletes did an interview with Duck quarterback Marcus Mariota before his Heisman win and before the Rose Bowl win that is sending Mariota and the Ducks to the National Championships against Ohio State. 

In the interview with FCA, of which he is a member, Mariota discusses his Christian faith and going "all in for Him."

Some highlights (and you can read the full interview here as well as a perspective from Charisma News (Breaking News. Spiritual Perspective) on the interview here.)

 How is your faith a part of you being a football player? 

 Being a football player, faith plays a huge role. When things start to get rough you find comfort in your faith. Knowing that no matter what, you can dust yourself off and be okay. And you know you do it for [God’s] glory. You do it for your teammates, your family, but also for His glory and to represent His name.


What has God taught you about yourself while at Oregon?

… I’ve learned that no matter what, my faith will guide me. However I play on the field, I know my faith will guide me. After sports, my faith will guide me. As I’ve grown in my faith, that’s something that’s given me comfort. God has taught me that I can trust in Him. No matter what–whether things are good or bad–I know I can always trust in Him. And that has really allowed me to go All In for Him.

Neither the Charistma story nor the FCA interview mention that whole "Jesus, girls and Marcus Mariota" thing.

December 7, 2014 12:37 PM

Video of law enforcement officers beating a Ducks game attendee with police batons was posted on Facebook by Kim Bliss and is swiftly making the social media rounds. The footage from the game in Santa Clara, California is disturbing particularly in view of the recent attention to police brutality and overzealous use of force the Eric Garner and Michael Brown cases have wrought.

Those cases of course involve white officers shooting and killing unarmed black men, and minorities are disproportionately affected by police brutality — despite what Bill O'Reilly might think — and that's quite different from beating a fan at a Ducks game, but perhaps an incident like this helps bring the discussion of excessive use of force to a larger white population who think "that wouldn't happen to me." 

Bliss writes in her post, which you can see below with the video, that the man getting hit with the batons "was there with his son and tried to go down the wrong pathway" and says the police had a Taser out right before she began to record. 



Update: The Facebook post has been taken down, but Deadspin has the video here.  The sports news site says it has confirmed with the Santa Clara Police Department that its officers were involved.

Still image from the video.

November 21, 2014 12:02 PM

UO Ducks football player Marcus Mariota got a speeding ticket. And paid his fine, the R-G reports. Not only is he good with the law now. He's good with God.

Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota on Thursday quickly put a speeding ticket behind him, pleading “no contest” to the traffic violation and paying off a $260 fine, according to Lane County Circuit Court records.

Mariota, 21, could have asked a judge to reduce the penalty he faced after a state trooper ticketed him during the early morning hours of Nov. 12 for driving 80 mph in a 55-mph zone on Highway 126W near Veneta.

Speeding is news when you're up for a Heisman trophy. And when other Ducks sports stars caught speeding have said things like, "We smoked it all."

But Mariota is OK because not only did he win the R-G's approbation for paying off the ticket, and the state trooper said he was polite and respectful, but also televangelist Pat Robertson says speeding is not a sin — so take a deep breath Mariota, you are good with God, even at 80 mph.

"Is it a sin? I think it's a sin to hurt somebody. I think it's a sin to drive recklessly ... If your driving imperils other people, you are sinning, there's no question about it. But in an open stretch of road, you go to Texas, I think some areas, there's no speed limit at all. There are times when police do pick you up, but I better not say any more. But the whole idea of traffic — it is... sin or not sin — it is to regulate the flow of traffic to keep people from hurting each other."


h/t The Oregonian for the Robertson info.