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EW! A Blog.

February 10, 2014 02:50 PM

Former Eugene resident making great music in Nashville.

February 6, 2014 04:13 PM

February 5, 2014 12:19 PM

Photos contributed by Jeremy Mabe

 

February 3, 2014 04:40 PM

February 3, 2014 01:58 PM

January 31, 2014 05:40 PM

Last night, (sub)Urban Projections in conjunction with the city of Eugene (and help from Harmonic Laboratory, hosted one of the best art events of 2014 thus far (people should not forget this event when "Best of Eugene" rolls around). At the risk of sounding hyperbolic, I would say it was transcendent. The Hult Center's lobby, a marvel of architecture with it's M.C. Escherian staircases and soaring, multilevel ceilings, became a trippy wonderland filled with some of the town's best modern dancers, digital artists and musicians.  In a perfectly paced one-hour event, (sub)Urban Projections guided a huge crowd through the nine different acts that made up  the digital art festival. Each act took place at a different spot, spanning levels and staircases, at five minute intervals. Meanwhile, there was also interactive ambient art that people could play around with. The crowd, which was much younger than the average audience that frequents the Hult, was captivated. Let's hope there's much more of these city-sponsored events to come.

Ninkasi is hosting a "Projection Reception" for the digital arts festival tonight.

January 30, 2014 05:52 PM

This is the update from Oregon Department of Environmental Quality today. Irony duly noted.

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has issued a penalty totaling $12,089 to Northwest Hazmat Inc. for storing hazardous waste without a permit and failing to transport hazardous waste to the intended disposal facility. A portion of the penalty reflects the fact that Northwest Hazmat is a professional hazardous waste transporter and provides hazardous waste cleanup services, and consulting and training in hazardous waste management, and therefore is expected to know the regulations.

January 30, 2014 02:30 PM

This just out this week from OSPIRG:

In light of recent privacy breaches at retailers like Target, Neiman Marcus and a potential breach this past week at Michaels, OSPIRG today released a resource, "Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft", offering straightforward steps consumers can take to help keep control of their information.

The resource includes advice on how to avoid identity theft, how to detect it and what to do if your information has been compromised. OSPIRG's advice covers how to make secure payments as well as how to minimize the damage identity theft can do to your credit. Consumers can also find information on how to take advantage of assistance offered by government agencies in restoring security to their information.

The top tips include:

 • Check your credit card and bank account statements regularlyfor fraudulent transactions and report them immediately to the company with which you have an account.

• If someone has stolen your information, get an Identity Theft Affidavit byreporting the breach to the Federal Trade Commission using the online complaint form or by calling 1-877-ID-THEFT and requesting the Affidavit when given the option.

Contact the three major credit reporting companiesto get a free credit report and place a fraud alert and security freeze on your accounts. If you suspect you are a victim of identity theft, you are entitled to an additional free credit report even if you have already received a free credit report from the credit bureaus within the last 12 months. 
Here is contact information for the three major credit reporting companies:

TransUnion: (800) 680-7289; www.transunion.com Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790

• Equifax: (800) 525-6285; www.equifax.com  P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241

• Experian: (888) EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com  P.O. Box 9554, Allen, TX 75013

 

"Consumers can use our guide to help avoid, detect and recover from identity theft," said OSPIRG's Evan Preston. 


January 29, 2014 06:22 PM

The Eugene City Council voted 6-2 today to allow the Whoville camp for the unhoused at the corner of Broadway and Hilyard to remain for another 30 days. 

Homeless advocate Alley Valkyrie of the Nightingale Public Advocacy Collective attended the meeting and took a rather puzzling photo of Councilor George Poling.

Valkyrie posted the picture to her Facebook page and writes:

This was no coincidence, no slip of the finger, so to speak. Councilor Poling, the only councilor who openly and regularly expresses bigoted and prejudiced views towards the homeless, held his finger up in this position at an audience full of homeless advocates for a significant portion of the discussion about Whoville. I saw his finger up for at least 15 minutes, and at one point he moved his hand to scratch his face and then deliberately put his finger up again.

City Council meetings can be watched live or via Metro TV here.

Update: 

According to Jan Bohman, community relations director for the city of Eugene, Councilor Poling "often rests his head on his hand" in this particular position, and he can be seen earlier in the webcast of the meeting during the discussion of the Amazon Headwaters with his hand and finger in the same position, she says. She calls EW "irresponsible" for posting Valkyrie's photo.

January 28, 2014 04:28 PM

January 28, 2014 06:27 PM

Lane County Commission candidate Sandi Mann announced this afternoon (Jan. 28) that she is dropping out of the primary race for the Springfield District 2 position. She says she had put her campaign on the shelf for a few weeks in December and January, and “Now that I am able to get back to it, I’ve lost a lot of momentum.”

Mann says it was difficult to recruit enough volunteers and raise enough money to mount a serious campaign, but she appreciates the support she did receive. Mann is a substitute teacher with area school districts and has been involved in numerous social justice organizations over the years. She served on the Unitarian Church’s Social Justice Comittte and has also been involved  in the work of Occupy Interfaith Social Justice.

This commission race is now down to incumbent Sid Leiken and Springfield City Councilor Sheri Moore. Leiken waited until Jan. 20 to announce that he will be running again.

In 2012, Mann ran for the Oregon Legislature against John Lively and Joe Pishioneri.

January 28, 2014 04:44 PM

Post-snowball fights, etc., here's some UO news we can be proud of:

 

EUGENE, Ore. — (Jan. 28, 2014) — Geraldine Richmond, the Presidential Chair and professor of chemistry at the University of Oregon, has been chosen to serve as president-elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Richmond will begin her three-year term as an officer and member of the Executive Committee of the AAS Board of Directors on Feb. 19 at the close of the 180th Annual Meeting in Chicago.
 
“The impact of Dr. Richmond’s work can be seen on this campus and around the world,” said Kimberly Andrews Espy, vice president for research and innovation and dean of the UO Graduate School. “For her, research is a means of discovery and of training and of cultivating the scientists of tomorrow. Her passion for scientific research, teaching, and international engagement makes her an ideal choice to serve as the president-elect of the world’s largest general scientific society. We congratulate her on this tremendous honor.”
 
Richmond received her Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1980. She is a distinguished researcher in the field of surface chemistry of complex surfaces and interfaces, a discipline with relevance to environmental remediation, energy production and atmospheric chemistry. She has served on several national scientific advisory boards, including the U.S. Secretary of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Advisory Committee and her current appointment to the National Science Board.
 
In her candidate statement, submitted after being nominated for president-elect, Richmond said she planned to work with the AAAS’s members, officers and directors toward a common goal of assuring the health and vitality of the scientific enterprise around the world. She spoke of the importance of scientific diplomacy and international collaborations and the unique global role played by the AAAS, as well as the need to continue to advocate for science funding and to assure a strong, diverse, motivated and inclusive scientific workforce.
 
Richmond holds the UO’s Presidential Chair in Science. She delivered the UO's Presidential Research Lecture last May, in which she discussed the essential properties of water – everything from the way water and oil interact to the ways in which water sustains life.
In addition to her service to the National Science Board and the University of Oregon, Richmond served on the Oregon State Board of Higher Education, the statutory governing board of the Oregon University System and its seven universities, from 1999-2006. She has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the American Physical Society (APS) Davisson-Germer Prize for Atomic or Surface Physics, the American Chemical Society (ACS) Charles L. Parsons Award, and was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences.
Richmond also is the founder and chair of COACh, an organization created to increase the number and career success of women scientists and engineers both in the U.S. and in developing countries. COACh provides training workshops, mentoring and networking activities and support to recruit and retain women for careers in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.
 
Richmond received an AAAS fellowship in 2003 and is one of 36 current or retired UO faculty members who have been recognized as AAAS fellows by their peers for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications. Most recently, in November 2013, the UO’s J. Josh Snodgrass, a biological anthropologist, and Tom H. Stevens, a biochemist, were named fellows. They will beformally presented with official certificates and gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pins during the AAAS annual meeting in February.
At the close of the 2014 Annual Meeting, Richmond will begin her term as president-elect and Gerald Fink will begin his term as AAAS president. Fink is a professor of genetics and founding member of the Whitehead Institute at MIT. The current president, Phillip A. Sharp, will become chairman of the AAAS Board of Directors. Sharp is a 1983 Nobel Prize winner and professor at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT.
 
Founded in 1848, AAAS is the world's largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journals Science, Science Translational Medicine and Science Signaling.
The full election results can be viewed at http://bit.ly/1evhmJ5.