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August 1, 2012 10:51 AM

I admit, the Eugene Emeralds lost some of their fun for me when they moved to PK Park. I miss Civic; it had that peanuts and CrackerJacks feel that I associate with baseball. Since I associate very little else with baseball, including how to play, this was a rather important element.

But I do give the Ems points for all their promotional efforts. This week it's Grateful Dead night at PK Park. 

Press relase: 

 

Ems Host Grateful Dead Night Thursday

Eugene, Ore. - The Eugene Emeralds, Single-A affiliate of the San Diego Padres, will host Grateful Dead Night Thursday at PK Park. The gates for the game, against the Everett AquaSox, will open at 5 p.m. for a performance by Dead Ringers, in advance of the 7:05 p.m. game.

The Emeralds will be wearing custom Jerry Garcia themed Grateful Dead uniform tops (pictured below) to commemorate the themed night.

Springfield’s Kaleidoscope Clothing will be at the game, selling tie dyed shirts and bandanas. Some will be in Emeralds colors. Fans are encouraged to bring in their own items to tie dye.

Like every Thursday home game, it will be Thirsty Thursday. This features discounted domestic beers and soft drinks.

Current University of Oregon and Lane Community College students can buy a ticket to the game for just $5 by showing their valid Student ID at the Ticket Office.

Great tickets are available for this game and remaining home games, online at EmeraldsBaseball.com and at the PK Park Ticket Office. The Ticket Office is located 2760 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and open during the week from 9-5. 

Yup, that's right, you can drink beer, get tie-dyed stuff, tie-dye stuff yourself and listen to a Dead cover band. But best of all are the special T-shirts the Ems will be wearing, proudly emblazoned with Jerry's face. I want one. Nothing says the Grateful Dead like a baseball player wearing a purply-bluey-red Jerry T-shirt.

August 1, 2012 11:06 AM

Another one:

 

On July 19, a downtown officer saw a subject he recognized and who he was aware had violated a restraining order during a recent incident. Two officers contacted the subject and verified that he had violated the order and needed to be arrested. During the arrest, the subject attempted to flee and violently fought with officers.  As he was struggling, officers discovered he had an illegal switch blade tucked in the back waistband of his trousers. After the subject was handcuffed and he calmed down somewhat, a search revealed he was in possession of nine individually packaged portions of marijuana and several 20 dollar bills.  He was lodged in the Lane County Jail and charged with Violation of a Restraining Order, Resisting Arrest, Escape, Carrying a Concealed Weapon, and Unlawful Delivery of a Controlled Substance. The arresting officer asked that the court consider a 90 day exclusion.

The subject has previously been on probation for Coercion and Assault 4 (felony). He has been arrested locally for Criminal Mischief twice, Violation of Park Rules once, Criminal Trespassing three times, Violation of Restraining Order four times, Assault five times, Coercion once, Delivery of a Controlled Substance twice, Public Indecency once, Physical Harassment twice, Escape once (in addition to the new incident), Interfering with a Police Officer, Identity Theft, and Supplying Contraband - knife (to a correction facility).

The subject is a black male with a Eugene address on W. 10th Avenue

August 1, 2012 12:38 PM

EW film critic and former arts editor Molly Templeton got some love on Jezebel for her response to the New York Times Book Review's How-To Issue, which included 2/8 cover stories from women, which were about cooking and raising kids. I love how Molly explains her objections:

There is nothing wrong with cooking and raising children; there are lots of things right and wonderful with these pursuits. They are also, as I'm sure I don't need to tell you, traditionally female tasks, and when you take into consideration the VIDA stats, the history of gender imbalance in literature and journalism and the world at large, you might find yourself a little frustrated by the fact that it's 2012 and we are still too often relegated to writing about deeply gendered topics. (Of the 18 bylined reviews and essays in the issue, five are by women.)

Check out the awesome Tumblr she made in response. If you're a woman or girl, submit something!
August 1, 2012 02:11 PM

I'm a little puzzled by all the "Julia Child would have been 100 this week" stories I've been reading — did we expect her to live to be a 100? But that aside, she is wierdly fascinating even to someone like me who thinks cooking is putting a little bag of TastyBites in the microwave for 2 minutes. Also, she makes large cuts of meat chic.

Watch Julia Child's 100th birthday on PBS. See more from WGBH Specials.

July 30, 2012 05:42 PM

Find more information at www.womenspaceinc.org

July 27, 2012 01:51 PM

Thanks to Hugh Massingill for recording and sharing this video of the July 18 council meeting discussing the siting of a camp for the homeless and their support system.

July 27, 2012 03:35 PM

As promised in "Let's Boogie"; Dog dancing, aka, canine musical freestyle videos.

The merengue:

 

Britain's Got Talent has kicked off a new wave of dog dance enthusiasm:

 

And Oregon's own Julie Flanery dances to "Baby, Darling Baby" with Kashi.

July 27, 2012 03:41 PM

In case you missed our July 16th post mentioned in this week's "Cruel Rabbit Roundup" story, here it is again as filmed by Heather and Alex Crippen of the Red Barn Rabbit Rescue.

Heather Crippen points out that YouTube has designated the video not suitable for those under 17 due to the animal cruelty portrayed. Ironic, she says, since the participants in the "animal scramble" are 4 to 14.

July 27, 2012 09:56 AM

 

After some frenetic banjo picking on Friday, July 27, at the Cuthbert Amphitheater, Steve Martin decides it’s time for him to go Google himself offstage (“it’s been over 45 minutes,” he says) and let the Steep Canyon Rangers entertain for a song or two.

“Charles do you have a beer or something?” Martin says to bass player, Charles Humphrey III. Deadpan, Humphrey slides open a hidden wooden panel in his bass and pulls out a cool one for the comedian, who strides off stage, beer in hand, to a roar of applause and laughter from the crowd.

The Steep Canyon Rangers, including Humphrey (bass, vocals), Woody Platt (guitar, lead vocals), Mike Guggino (mandolin, vocals), Nicky Sanders (fiddle, vocals) and Graham Sharp (banjo, vocals), began in the ‘90s as a college band in Brevard, N.C., where they got into bluegrass through New Grass Revival and Old and in the Way. In 2006, the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) named the The Steep Canyon Rangers as Emerging Artists of the Year. By 2011, the Rangers and Martin collectively won the IBMA’s Entertainers of the Year award after collaborating on the album Rare Bird Alert.

For the well-mannered Rangers, collaborating with Martin for a bluegrass comedy tour was a rather smooth transition. “In the history of bluegrass, there’s always a goofball who did the comedy. Comedy was always a part of it,” says Sharp. “Lester Flatt was such a great MC and there’s a tradition to that. It’s not too much of a stretch.”

For a music genre that typically contains content about love lost or solitary hardships, a bluegrass band would have to have a particular sense of humor to play songs like “Jubilation Day,” about a playfully bitter break-up, or “Atheists Don’t Have No Songs.” And the Rangers do so with the discipline of Bill Munroe or Del McCoury. The harmonies on “Atheists Don’t Have No Songs” are so crisp and breathtaking that, no matter what your creed (this song received, by far, the rowdiest reception), it’s easy to see why these guys are one of the biggest names in modern bluegrass.

Nobody Knows You, the Rangers’ latest album, was released this spring and is noticeably more vocal heavy. “We took a few more chances on this record than maybe we have in the past,” says Sharp. “I think playing with Steve gave us a lot more confidence.”

The Rangers are planning to return to Eugene this March with the Nobody Knows You tour.

— Alexandra Notman

 

July 27, 2012 05:45 PM

The long-awaited follow up to the Mr. Rogers song is here!

July 26, 2012 04:38 PM

Sam Bond’s Anniversary Bash

Sam Bond’s Garage has been a Whiteaker fixture for seventeen years, too old to count in bar time. Consistently voted by EW readers as Eugene’s favorite watering hole, the Sam Bond’s Anniversary Variety Showbrings together a heap of local performers who’ve graced the venue’s wooden stage over the past years.

Tom Heinl and Scott Kof Monday night bingo notoriety will act as masters of ceremony, rambling, joking, drinking and calling bingo between music sets throughout the night. “There will definitely be a blackout round,” Heinl says. Whether he meant this with regard to the cash-prize bingo game or the state of inebriation is unclear.

One thing to look forward to is the three-piece one-off ZZ Top cover band composed of guitarist Jake Pavlak(Ferns), bassist Dave Snider(Test Face) and drummer Rob Smith, that will put some hair on your chin. “It’s all early ‘70s stuff, Pavlak says. “It’s been fun learning these new tunes.”

And if that beard of yours, pints-deep in the evening, needs a lift out of the ol’ Mason jar, the lovely ladies of the Red Raven Folliesalso perform.

Hey, as if that isn’t enough, the rambunctious bluegrass of the Alder Street All-Starswill have you stomping, swinging and pushing tables out of the way to dance. But wait, there’s even more. Vaudevillian folk/jazz, provided by Hot Milk, should wear in your dancing boots for the evening, and the mellow jazz compositions of Geoffrey Mays should help with the cool down process.Of course, the evening wouldn’t be complete without an early, pre-funk set by The Stagger and Sway, guitaring up the night from the outset.

Saturated in strong beer, this showcase of local talent will no doubt bring about a good start to the next year of Sam Bond’s entertainment.

Sam Bond’s Anniversary Show “Too Old To Count” starts 9 pm Saturday, July 28, at Sam Bond’s; $5. 

— Patrick Newson

 

       

July 26, 2012 04:12 PM

 

Indie folk rockers Wintertime Carousel are on the verge of releasing a new EP, not to mention the fact that they’re kicking off a West Coast tour to San Diego and back to promote the album. Spoiler alert: The new EP is really fucking good.

Simon Adler positions his vocals in the foreground of hallowed-hall reverb created by the perfect nighttime glitter and twang of droning electric guitars. Layers of brass and thick bass lines hug your ears tight as the four track EP rolls on toward inspired greatness. Since its first release in 2010, Carousel has evolved toward becoming a solidified indie racket, with the songwriting becoming heartfelt, personal and far more meaningful than it used to, and nowadays the instrumentation is downright savage in its slow, tense arrangement.

Wintertime Carousel was once a stormy sea, and has now calmed and matured into something far more adult. They’ll still knock your teeth out with a single punch, though, so don’t cast off the five minute songs as desolate whines. They’re the crooning, powerful tracks of Carousel’s new EP, and you can hear them tonight.

Wintertime Carousel plays with Strum Theory & Royal Blue 10 pm Thursday, July 26, at Luckey’s; $3 — Andy Valentine

July 25, 2012 10:49 AM

A new video from Predator Defense, intended for media use but also suitable for general public consumption.

July 25, 2012 03:19 PM

Harpist Thaddeu "Gaffer" Venar from Boulder, Colo., is in town to perform at Faerieworlds and will also play at 7:30 pm Tuesday, July 31, at Reality Kitchen, 245 Van Buren. Sliding scale. No one turned away.