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November 28, 2012 04:45 PM

Local car dealer Ridley's Rides is getting some attention from Ad Week and elsewhere  for its eBay listings that supposedly use the owner's daughter to sell cars, sexy-style. I notice that they don't use sexy pics for the station wagons. 

Local TV station KVAL jumped on the story and revealed that nope, it's not a daughter, merely a "longtime friend." This sort of begs the questions as to why he said it was his daughter in the first place, but I will just leave that to your speculation.

November 27, 2012 06:19 PM

November 20, 2012 10:27 PM

Just because EW had early Tofurky Day deadlines does not mean you don't need to hear more about the Lane County Board of County Commissioners meeting today. They didn't just talk turkey and pilgrims, they talked animals and air.

Animals

Animal advocates having been coming to commission meetings and speaking up. As a result, the commission voted to retain the animal advisory committee, look into changes in its contract with Greenhill and to fill open positions on the committee. Looks like from this web update that the R-G will have a full story Nov. 21, so I will move on to air.

Air

Commish Jay Bozievich helpfully fowarded an email about a 1:30 pm Nov. 27 work session at Harris Hall on the Lane Regional Air Protection Agency (LRAPA).

Two of the topics which will be discussed at this work session are:

What would the community lose without LRAPA?

What costs would local governments incur without LRAPA?

Merlyn Hough, LRAPA executive director, wrote up a briefing report on the agency (see below). Some praise LRAPA for its air quality monitoring and programs for improving air quality, like the one that replaces wood stoves with cleaner-burning stoves. Other say LRAPA rubber-stamps industry permits, like the Seneca biomass-burning plant. Either way, if you care about LRAPA you should show up for the work session. Worked for the animal folks.

November 20, 2012 05:43 PM

God (and capitalism) is good; God (and capitalism) is great. Thank God (and capitalism )for the food we eat. 

It's the new conservative Thanksgiving grace. 

Ok I made that up.

Some people celebrate Thanksgiving as a family event, others as a day to mourn what's happened to America's indignous peoples, still more go for the Chinese food and movie option. And of course a whole sh*t ton of people see Thanksgving as the day before they go on a crazy shopping spree. But according to some sources, that shopping spree is probably the idea way to celebrate Turkey Day because that's what it's really about. Capitalism. 

Capitalism was the lesson of the day from Commissioner Jay Boziviech (West Lane) at the Lane County Board of Commissioners meeting On Nov. 20. During the Commissioners Remonstrance Boziviech took the opportunity to tell the "real" story of Thanksgiving, which in this version (which seems to be taken directly from Rush Limbaugh's book and the story he repeats each year on his show), basically: Thanksgiving is the celebration of a pilgrimic triumph over communism and a celebration of capitalism. 

Here's what he said:

I kind of want to remind people about the real story of Thanksgiving. There’s been a lot of myths around it: You know the Pilgrims and the Indians and the Indians taught the Pilgrims how to grow food and that’s what they were celebrating. That’s not the real story.

The Pilgrims, on the way across the ocean, developed a societal system that was basically a commune, long before Lenin was ever alive, they came to America, started this communal system of common property where everybody’s food that they grew was thrown in a common storehouse and taken out at will. And you know what? Over the first couple winters they starved because people had no incentive to produce and there was a lot of corruption and theft from the warehouse. So they finally decided to let people have ownership over a plot of land and keep the goods that they grew.

And you know what? That the following year they had a tremendous bounty they and held a celebration and that was the first Thanksgiving. Basically what you are celebrating in Thanksgiving is private property rights and being able to hang on to the fruits of your own labor. … Please remember why we celebrate it and that’s because it was about private property rights and capitalism. 

America: We kicked communism's ass before communism was even born.

You can watch it on video here. The turkey talk starts about 42 minutes in.

Google Pilgrim communists and you will get a lot of conservative and Tea Party website hits.The Christian Science Monitor did a nice historical look at Thanksiving that talks about how the Pilgrims' journals discussed the whole Pilgrims and Native Americans thing.

In a letter to a friend, dated December 1621, Edward Winslow wrote: "Our harvest being gotten in, our Governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a more special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruit of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time, among other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest King Massasoit, with some 90 men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others."

I figured the whole communism gets smashed thing had to come from somewhere. In fact, the Pilgrims came to the New (to white folks) World as a joint-stock venture, funded by London businessmen looking to make a profit. Joint-stock ventures were precursors to modern corporations. The Pilgrims did at first govern themselves under the Mayflower Compact, which called for a communal system. They did indeed switch to small individually owned plots of land. And the "communist" Mayflower Compact … was a founding document of the Constitution. The mind boggles. 

I'm not entirely sure what the take-away lesson is here, but I'm going to suggest you not honor capitalism by becoming a human sacrifice when some Walmart opens its doors at o'dark thirty on Black Friday. 

November 16, 2012 07:04 PM

The recent debate on EW's Facebook page  and blog about the Diablos poster led to a lot of conversations about race, fetishization and how we conceive of and portray Native Americans, African-Americans, race and whiteness. Diablos apologized for the poster, pulled it and went to dialogue with local indigenous people at the UO's Many Nations Longhouse, a pretty classy response to concerns from the community.

Here's what Diablos said in response to the FB comments:

There's been an unfortunate controversy over our "Spanksgiving Fetish Night" poster. In this case, we have to agree with our critics and take our lumps so to speak. The poster was in poor taste. 

While fetish events frequently offend someone, this is a case where the offense was not intentional and poorly considered. The posters and facebook event logo have been pulled and changed. We sincerely apologize for the offense.

By nature fetishes frequently involve objectification, within the fetish community it is mandatory that it be consensual objectification. In this case we made a big mistake and didn't consider consent of the community we were depicting. We try to be a completely inclusive bar. We host drag shows, fundraisers, bingo, fetish events, and we have a very diverse clientele. 

We failed this time. We are very sorry!

This video by the 1491s came up in some of the comments. Favorite part? "Clueless" shirtless hipster in headdress. 

November 16, 2012 12:10 PM

Lord Leebrick Theatre will be hosting a free public discussion at 4:30 pm Sunday, Nov. 18, following the 2:00 pm matinee showing of Next Fall. Basic Rights Oregon will be there to discuss the passage of Measure 74 in Washington and how it compares to the future of marriage equality in Oregon. "It's interesting in light of what transpired in the election in terms of having the first forward motion in a popular vote on marriage equality," Lord Leebrick Artistic Director Craig Willis says. 

This discussion will be a warm up for a Feb. 10 reading of "8 The Play," written by Acadamy Award-winning screenwriter Dustin Land Black (Milk, J. Edgar), about Perry v. Brown - the case that held that California's Proposition 8 was unconstitutional. Lord Leebrick will be coproducing the reading, performed by local actors and community members.

 

 

November 15, 2012 10:24 AM

Bjork seems to have a bottomless bag of creativity and artistry. Check out her newest music video for "Mutual Core." It brings puppetry and sand to a new level. Don't miss the behind-the-scenes video after to learn all the secrets.

November 15, 2012 04:49 PM

Word has gotten out that The Eugene Register-Guard is planning to move  music and entertainment (Ticket) reporter Serena Markstrom to a news beat. Admitedly the R-G and  EW have a friendly rivalry going on, and we cheerfully snark the daily whenever we can, but I don't know that we've ever snarked Serena* because, let's face it, she's good. 

Newspapers are facing draining resources and shrinking newsrooms. Local voices like Serena's are what keep papers like the R-G relevant. Not only does she win praise from her readers and local musicians for her coverage of the Eugene scene, she can work PajamaJeans into a New Year's Eve entertainment story. 

So, EW thinks there needs to be a letter writing campaign: Keep Serena Writing Entertainment (why yes, we DID make a Facebook page, doesn't every good cause need one? And we stole the photo from her Pinterest page.) Email works too. But remember, WRITE, it's not enough to grumble or to just "like" a page.

Is it weird the alt weekly would start a letter-writing campaign in support of the compeition? (After all, the idea is the R-G is better with Serena on entertainment would mean EW is, gasp, trying to help the daily.) Maybe, but our alternative voice is better if the mainstream voice is good. 

Like Serena's writing? Like the coverage she's given local musicians?  Write the R-G and tell the editors that they need to keep her on the entertainment beat and tell them why.

Write a letter to the editor and make your opinion known: rgletters@registerguard.com.

Oh hell, write EWa letter to the editor, too: Letters@eugeneweekly.com

Editor and publisher Tony Baker: tony.baker@registerguard.com

Team Editor for Oregon Life, Food, Arts, Entertainment and Health/Fitness Mark Baker: mark.baker@registerguard.com

And if all else fails, drop Bob Welch a note. He's a columnist that always seems to like a good cause: bob.welch@registerguard.com

 

* Yes, in journalism you do call people by their last names, but we know Serena and sometimes you have to break the AP style rules.

November 14, 2012 04:54 PM

The Elliott State Forest has been the focus of local campaigns to stop the logging of the last of Oregon's coastal rain forest. It would seem that when you mix good old fashioned lawsuits with some good old fashioned protests, you get somewhere. 

Citing Marbled Murrelet Lawsuit, Oregon Suspends Clearcutting on 914 Acres of Old-growth Forests on the Elliott State Forest

Conservation Organizations Applaud the State but Push for Lasting Protections

SALEM, Ore.- After a lawsuit by conservation groups, the State of Oregon has suspended logging of 914 acres of old-growth forest on the Elliott State Forest that is habitat for the threatened marbled murrelet. Previously, ten timber sales were suspended in response to the lawsuit filed in July by Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity, and the Audubon Society of Portland. The suit asserts that the state is harming the rare seabird by logging its nesting habitat in violation of the Endangered Species Act.

"The state of Oregon has been playing fast and loose with the law for years in the way it claims to 'protect' the imperiled marbled murrelet," said Francis Eatherington, conservation director of Cascadia Wildlands. "The decision to further defer hundreds of acres of clearcuts is one that we welcome and provides interim relief for the murrelet."

Plaintiffs discovered the logging deferral announcement in an Oregon Department of Forestry memo, dated Sept. 19, 2012, that was just recently posted to the Department's website. The memo suggests that the State will defer 15 additional timber sales until the lawsuit currently pending in U.S. District Court is resolved, and that the State will work to identify other logging projects that are free of the contested issues in the case. Plaintiffs have long advocated the state focus its timber operations on young plantation forests in need of restoration rather than older forests that are critical to the survival of a host of endangered species, including marbled murrelets.

"Logging on state forests cannot be done at the expense of the survival of the marbled murrelet or any other animals that depend on old forests for their survival," said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director with the Center for Biological Diversity. "The last remaining old forests in Oregon are precious and need to be protected not just for the marbled murrelet, but for future generations."

The most recent status review of the murrelet by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found the birds have been declining by about four percent per year and that this decline relates to continued loss of habitat, primarily on state and private lands.

The State of Oregon recently abandoned its decade-long attempt to develop habitat conservation plans (HCPs) for the Elliott, as well as the Clatsop and Tillamook State Forests, that would have given it a federal permit for limited impacts to marbled murrelets in exchange for habitat protection measures designed to enhance the bird's conservation. Rather than improving habitat protections, the state walked away from the HCP process altogether and instead ramped up logging on all three forests. The lawsuit seeks to force the State to halt logging practices that are harmful to murrelets until it develops a plan that will protect murrelets and the mature forests on which the birds and other species depend.

"It is time for the State to return to the table and negotiate a balanced plan for each of the state forests that will provide adequate protection for the murrelet, allow for responsible and sustainable logging, and ensure that the State meets the requirements of the Endangered Species Act," said Bob Sallinger, conservation director for the Audubon Society of Portland.

The conservation organizations are represented by outside counsel Daniel Kruse of Eugene, Tanya Sanerib and Chris Winter of the Crag Law Center, Nick Cady of Cascadia Wildlands, Scott Jerger of Field Jerger LLP, and Susan Jane Brown of the Western Environmental Law Center.

November 14, 2012 05:12 PM

Robert Kuttner, who was recently in Eugene (see our Oct. 4 issue), is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospectmagazine and author of “A Presidency in Peril: The Inside Story of Obama’s Promise, Wall Street’s Power, and the Struggle to Control Our Economic Future.”

 

   In a recent piece in the Huffington Post titled “Let’s Not Make a Deal,” Kuttner writes: “We need more public spending both because the private economy is weak and because Hurricane Sandy just revealed the need for hundreds of billions of more outlay to protect our coastal communities from ocean waters that will continue rising. We will need hundreds of billions beyond that invested in renewable energy to keep global climate change from worsening. ...

 

   "The president's own proposed budget cuts of $4 trillion over 10 years average out to $400 billion a year. In other words, the Obama Cliff is almost as large as the fiscal cliff that everyone dreads. Whatever the precise mix of tax increases and spending cuts, $4 trillion is too big a cliff. …

 

   “In that aborted [budget] deal [of 2011], Obama was prepared to cut Social Security and increase the Medicare eligibility age. White House leaks have suggested that both items will be on the table this time. That's bad policy, and worse politics. The clearest principled differences that distinguish Democrats from Republicans is that Democrats are staunch defenders of Social Security and Medicare, while Republicans are eager to cut, privatize, and voucherize.

 

   “So the good news is that the Democrats won the election and President Obama's spine has been stiffened on the subject of taxes. The bad news is that the skids are greased for a budget deal that cuts more than necessary, risks putting the economy back into recession, and blurs differences between the parties on critical issues like Social Security and Medicare.

 

   “If Obama will just realize it, he holds most of the cards. He prevailed in the election. Most voters agree that the rich should pay higher taxes. Most don't want cuts in Medicare and Social Security. …

 

   “But by all appearances, the eager-beaver bipartisan Obama that we saw in early 2009, (until he got his clock cleaned) is back. Despite his recent victory, if he is too eager to make a deal, he —and we — will get rolled.”

 

See the full story at www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-kuttner/fiscal-cliff_b_2115237.html

November 14, 2012 02:20 PM

Attention arts and culture nonprofits!

The Oregon Cultural Trust has created a field guide, "Oregon Culture: A Field Guide," that aggregates the activities of the more than 1,300 arts, heritage and humanities  nonprofits in the state. Until Nov. 15, you can go nominate cultural activities for the guide.

Current "Featured Activities" include "Visit the Northwest's most Vibrant Latino Theatre" (nonprofit Miracle Theatre in Portland) and "Attending the largest outdoor quilt show in the world" (nonprofit Sisters' Outdoor Quilt Show).

Current nominees for Eugene include the Shelton-McMurphey-Johnson House, the Oregon Country Fair and the University of Oregon Libraries' collection of Ken Kesey manuscripts, papers and letters. This isn't just for pride of making the guide, the Oregon Cultural Trust has dished out over $11 million in grants to arts and culture nonprofits since 2003.

November 14, 2012 11:34 AM

Leading Oregon activists for marijuana legalization met in Lincoln City last weekend following the defeat of Measure 80. They discussed the future of marijuana politics in the state of Oregon and the impact that election victories legalizing marijuana for adults in Washington and Colorado would have on their next move. 

 

Here is an edited version of their press release, sent to EWby Jim Greig of Eugene:

 

Attendees included John Sajo, executive director of Voter Power; Jim Greig, board member of Voter Power; Portland attorney Leland Berger; and lobbyist Anthony Taylor. Also in attendance were Todd Dalotto, chair of the Oregon Health Authority’s Advisory Committee on Medical Marijuana (ACMM) and president of CAN! Research; Lori Duckworth, executive director of Southern Oregon NORML at the S.O. Cannabis Community Center. 

 

“The legalization of marijuana is inevitable,” said Sajo. “Oregon’s Ballot Measure 80 to implement a regulated approach to marijuana use by adults nearly passed,” said Sajo, “Measure 80’s strong showing of 47 percent of the vote with virtually no money spent on the campaign, indicates Oregon voter’s support to end prohibition.”

 

Activists also welcomed the call by The Oregonianeditorial board for the Legislature to refer a marijuana legalization proposal to the voters.

 

“We agree with The Oregonianthat the Legislature is better equipped to flesh out the details of legalization than activists,” said Anthony Taylor, Director of Oregonians for Safe Access. “And after decades of opposing our efforts, it is a welcome change.”

 

The group discussed its several proposals being drafted by legislative counsel for pre-session filing and other proposals being considered for introduction during the general session including the addition of PTSD to the list of qualifying conditions.

 

“I am very impressed by the resolve of Oregon activists in the wake of our movement’s success on election day,” said Michael Krawitz, plaintiff in ASA’s (American’s for Safe Access) lawsuit against the Drug Enforcement Administration’s refusal to re-schedule marijuana. “It is my sincere hope that these meetings will lead to much needed reform of Oregon’s marijuana law to protect the state’s disabled military veterans who have, in statistically high numbers, suffered from under-treated PTSD, resulting in a corresponding increase in homelessness, joblessness and despair in large part due to marijuana’s illegality, “ Krawitz added.

November 14, 2012 05:24 PM

Update:

Diablos responded very quickly to the comments on its Facebook page and to EW's request for comment:

    Shame on us.... yes, agreed. It was in VERY poor taste. here's our general response on the issue ... While fetish events frequently offend someone, this is a case where the offence was not intentional and poorly considered. The posters and facebook event logo have been pulled and changed. We sincerely apologize for the offence.

   By nature fetishes frequently involve objectification, within the fetish community it is mandatory that it be consensual objectification. In this case we made a big mistake and didn't consider consent of the community we were depicting. We try to be a completely inclusive bar. We host drag shows, fundraisers, bingo, fetish events, and we have a very diverse clientele. We failed this time. We are very sorry!

Diablos is having a Fetish Ball Thanksgiving weekend, and its poster uses a woman in an "Indian headdress" to advertise the event.

For many Native peoples and others, Thanksgiving marks the genocide of Native tribes and colonization of Native lands and wearing or depicting someone in an "Indian headdress" feeds into racist stereotypes. 

According to Will Doolittle who has begun calling attention to the poster on Facebook, "Diablos Bar, in Eugene Oregon, perpetuates racist stereotypes in advertising their 'Spanksgiving Fetish Night.' Their phone number is 541-343-2346. Their facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/diablosdtl I told the person answering the phone that they'd probably be receiving more calls about this insulting poster. She said she is sorry if people are offended but they can't do anything about it."

The response to the poster had only just begun as this blog went up, so Diablos has not yet had chance to respond to the Facebook comments. 

Word is that tomorrow, after culture night at the UO Many Nations longhouse (17th and Columbia), people will go as a group to approach Diablos about the issue.

November 13, 2012 07:00 PM

Washington made pot legal thanks to the passing of I-502 in the recent election, and now the cops have to deal with it, and Washingtonians have to deal with the cops. Luckily Seattle PD has made a handy FAQ called  Marijwhatnow? A Guide to Legal Marijuana Use In Seattlle to help.

The advice includes: 

Can I smoke pot outside my home? Like at a park, magic show, or the Bite of Seattle?

Much like having an open container of alcohol in public, doing so could result in a civil infraction—like a ticket—but not arrest. You can certainly use marijuana in the privacy of your own home. Additionally, if smoking a cigarette isn’t allowed where you are (say, inside an apartment building or flammable chemical factory), smoking marijuana isn’t allowed there either.

Will police officers be able to smoke marijuana?

As of right now, no. This is still a very complicated issue

What happens if I get pulled over and I’m sober, but an officer or his K9 buddy smells the ounce of Super Skunk I’ve got in my trunk?

Under state law, officers have to develop probable cause to search a closed or locked container. Each case stands on its own, but the smell of pot alone will not be reason to search a vehicle. If officers have information that you’re trafficking, producing or delivering marijuana in violation of state law, they can get a warrant to search your vehicle.

SPD seized a bunch of my marijuana before I-502 passed. Can I have it back?

No.

For the full page including a video clip from Lord of the Rings of Gandalf and Bilbo Baggins smoking "the finest weed" go to the Seattle Police Department web page