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January 12, 2012 12:00 AM

The script — Steve Martin’s rewrite of a German sex farce. Droll and just a little bit naughty, it’s exactly the type of play that sells a heap of tickets.

The script — Steve Martin’s rewrite of a German sex farce. Droll and just a little bit naughty, it’s exactly the type of play that sells a heap of tickets.

Johnny Ormsbee is a young director better known for exploring universal truth through unorthodox theatrical experiences than finding fun in a stock sex farce. But pair the two and you get the Very Little Theater’s latest offering, The Underpants, a traditional comedy gone wild with kazoo-playing gypsies.

January 5, 2012 12:00 AM

Over the umpty years we’ve been scribbling this column, we’ve begun each new year with an homage to Janus, the two-faced god — he who looks backwards and forwards at the same time — for whom the month is named. We wanted to praise the year that ended, and invoke, if possible, better times for the coming months. 

Over the umpty years we’ve been scribbling this column, we’ve begun each new year with an homage to Janus, the two-faced god — he who looks backwards and forwards at the same time — for whom the month is named. We wanted to praise the year that ended, and invoke, if possible, better times for the coming months. 

January 5, 2012 12:00 AM

 

The art of photojournalism is an undertaking that many dabble in but few master, and even fewer are remembered for. The old saying of a picture being worth a thousand words is true almost always, but perhaps never more unerringly so than when attached to the work of Dorothea Lange.

The art of photojournalism is an undertaking that many dabble in but few master, and even fewer are remembered for. The old saying of a picture being worth a thousand words is true almost always, but perhaps never more unerringly so than when attached to the work of Dorothea Lange

January 5, 2012 12:00 AM

The lack of money is the root of all evil,” George Bernard Shaw astutely clarifies. A well-known radical in his time, Pygmalion (the stage play from which My Fair Lady is taken) was Shaw’s biting commentary on class distinction, masked as a love story.

The lack of money is the root of all evil,” George Bernard Shaw astutely clarifies. A well-known radical in his time, Pygmalion (the stage play from which My Fair Lady is taken) was Shaw’s biting commentary on class distinction, masked as a love story.