• Eugene Weekly Loves You!
Share |

Culture

November 10, 2016 01:00 AM

In a coffeehouse downtown, local artist Alida Bevirt cradles a box in her arms like a delicate fawn. Setting the box on the table, she lovingly pulls out its papery contents: zine after zine after zine. She picks up one wrapped in protective plastic — Apocalypse Dad by Olympia artist Taylor Dow — and more follow, feathering out across the table in all sizes and colors, some as tiny as a matchbook, others larger, bound and glossy. 

In a coffeehouse downtown, local artist Alida Bevirt cradles a box in her arms like a delicate fawn. Setting the box on the table, she lovingly pulls out its papery contents: zine after zine after zine. She picks up one wrapped in protective plastic — Apocalypse Dad by Olympia artist Taylor Dow — and more follow, feathering out across the table in all sizes and colors, some as tiny as a matchbook, others larger, bound and glossy. 

November 10, 2016 01:00 AM

As the stage faded to black on the final scene of University Theatre’s current production of The Dead, and the cast finished belting out a musicalized version of what might be the finest closing paragraph in all of English fiction, I suddenly found myself clutching my head with both hands. Yes, I tend to overreact. I take no pleasure in relating this, but it must be done.

As the stage faded to black on the final scene of University Theatre’s current production of The Dead, and the cast finished belting out a musicalized version of what might be the finest closing paragraph in all of English fiction, I suddenly found myself clutching my head with both hands. Yes, I tend to overreact. I take no pleasure in relating this, but it must be done.

November 3, 2016 01:00 AM

Zoom. There went summer, then autumn. Time flies by, like the wind.

Wind? Nah, too slow. Sometimes I used to ask students how we could calculate the speed of time. The brightest lit up, thinking. Some whipped out their smartphones. An exercise in arithmetic followed: Earth is sorta spherical, about 24,000 around miles at the equator, makes a complete rotation in 24 hours, so the day goes by at 1,000 mph. Wind? Pah: never been a 1,000 mph wind. But that’s not all.

Zoom. There went summer, then autumn. Time flies by, like the wind.

Wind? Nah, too slow. Sometimes I used to ask students how we could calculate the speed of time. The brightest lit up, thinking. Some whipped out their smartphones. An exercise in arithmetic followed: Earth is sorta spherical, about 24,000 around miles at the equator, makes a complete rotation in 24 hours, so the day goes by at 1,000 mph. Wind? Pah: never been a 1,000 mph wind. But that’s not all.

November 3, 2016 01:00 AM

Director Michael P. Watkins of Actors Cabaret of Eugene brings a steampunk twist to Richard O’Brien’s cult musical The Rocky Horror Show and, of course, the performance will make you wish you’d donned your fishnets and black lace corset.

Director Michael P. Watkins of Actors Cabaret of Eugene brings a steampunk twist to Richard O’Brien’s cult musical The Rocky Horror Show and, of course, the performance will make you wish you’d donned your fishnets and black lace corset.

Unsuspecting newlyweds Janet (Hailey Henderson) and Brad (Benjamin Sanders) open the show’s wild ride with a tale of young love. Dammit, Janet, you should have known life is never as simple it seems. The pair faces car trouble while en route to visit former high school science teacher, Dr. Scott (Scott Machado).

November 3, 2016 01:00 AM

Don’t miss the Trauma Healing Project’s 3rd Annual Glow Variety Show at 7 pm Nov. 19 and 2 pm Nov. 20 at the Hult Center. This multicultural extravaganza features music, dance and acrobatics, with proceeds supporting healing arts for survivors of trauma; $28-$31.75. 

October 27, 2016 01:00 AM

Dan LeFranc’s quickly dives into a chaotic script with his play, The Big Meal, which features an otherwise mellow plot. Two young lovebirds meet and begin the dance of a relationship, sparking a tale that unfolds over the next five generations — all at the same restaurant table. 

Dan LeFranc’s quickly dives into a chaotic script with his play, The Big Meal, which features an otherwise mellow plot. Two young lovebirds meet and begin the dance of a relationship, sparking a tale that unfolds over the next five generations — all at the same restaurant table. 

The play had its off-Broadway world premiere at the American Theater Company in Chicago back in 2011. The character’s multi-generational stories unravel around the crucible that is the American dinner table, and director Brian Haimbach brings it to life at Oregon Contemporary Theatre.

October 20, 2016 01:00 AM

Sniffing out what you shouldn't miss in the arts this week

Eugene’s art community has a proud tradition of celebrating Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, the Nov. 1-2 Mexican holiday that honors the dead in wildly colorful and mischievous ways.

That grand dame, the Maude Kerns Art Center (MKAC), for one, has been hosting an exhibit and festivities for two-plus decades. The art center opened its 23rd annual show Oct. 14, which will be bursting with frenetic ofrendas (altars to the dead) dripping in marigolds and jittering, dancing calacas (skeletons) through Nov. 4.

October 20, 2016 01:00 AM

Significant rain in early October is a boon to gardeners who value the fall gardening season. This goes in spades for those of us who don’t irrigate heavily in summer. Some years we can be well into winter before the soil is fully workable, and that’s frustrating because we count on a long rainy season to get new plants established. 

Significant rain in early October is a boon to gardeners who value the fall gardening season. This goes in spades for those of us who don’t irrigate heavily in summer. Some years we can be well into winter before the soil is fully workable, and that’s frustrating because we count on a long rainy season to get new plants established. 

What’s more, this is the best time to move or divide certain plants that are naturally adapted to dry conditions in summer: For example, a number of iris are excellent low-water perennials, and several of them put out new roots in fall.  

October 20, 2016 01:00 AM

Ah, October: Corn mazes, jack-o-lanterns, kids in costumes and … undead ballet! 

Ah, October: Corn mazes, jack-o-lanterns, kids in costumes and … undead ballet! 

Eugene Ballet Company revives its masterful Giselle at 7:30 pm Oct. 28 and 2 pm Oct. 30 at the Hult Center. 

“The ballet was first staged for EBC in the fall of 1988 by Louis Godfrey and Denise Shultz, based on the revival staged by Marius Petipa for the Imperial Ballet in St. Petersburg (The Kirov),” says EBC artistic director Toni Pimble. 

October 13, 2016 01:00 AM

Alexandra Bonds’ retrospective costume fashion show this weekend, Portfolio, promises a lively look back at nearly four decades of stitching, with 40 garments leaping from literature to the runway each night.  

Rachel Dawn models the sun costume from the 1993 production Chimera. Photo by Athena Delene.

 

October 13, 2016 01:00 AM

Although I’m aware that conflicts of one kind or another have rocked Ireland for centuries, my knowledge of early 20th-century Irish history is admittedly, and perhaps regrettably, patchy, and I’m going to go ahead and wager that, in 2016, it is for most people.

Although I’m aware that conflicts of one kind or another have rocked Ireland for centuries, my knowledge of early 20th-century Irish history is admittedly, and perhaps regrettably, patchy, and I’m going to go ahead and wager that, in 2016, it is for most people.

And this is a hindrance for Very Little Theatre’s current production of Sean O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock, on now under the direction of Michael Walker. 

October 13, 2016 01:00 AM

If you could peer into this critic’s embryonic soul, I suspect you’d find A Chorus Line lyrics. 

I wore grooves into my album of the original cast recording as a kid, and heck, my supercool local public elementary school put it on as a fabulous bootleg production, minus the racier numbers, when I was in second grade. Over the years, I’ve probably seen it 25 times, from multiple national tours to Broadway. 

If you could peer into this critic’s embryonic soul, I suspect you’d find A Chorus Line lyrics. 

I wore grooves into my album of the original cast recording as a kid, and heck, my supercool local public elementary school put it on as a fabulous bootleg production, minus the racier numbers, when I was in second grade. Over the years, I’ve probably seen it 25 times, from multiple national tours to Broadway. 

In other words, I know this show. 

October 6, 2016 01:00 AM

Stop binge-watching Stranger Things on Netflix and get out into the dance community!

Stop binge-watching Stranger Things on Netflix and get out into the dance community!

XCape Dance Company presents X at 7:30 pm Friday, Oct. 7, at the Hult, featuring Work Dance Company, ZAPP, The Dance Factory, Flex Studios and music by Isaac Turner and Shelby Trotter. “X embodies the freedom of movement, self-expression, dedication, determination and passion exemplified by the Xcape Dance Company in their unique and inspiring shows,” says artistic director Vanessa Fuller. Tickets at hultcenter.org.

October 6, 2016 01:00 AM

I was ready to break into “September Song” or my whistling riff of “Early Autumn” when Mole got up in my face.

I was ready to break into “September Song” or my whistling riff of “Early Autumn” when Mole got up in my face.

The Round Mound of Merlot almost never gets angry, but he was clearly irked: “Yuz hoit my feelins laz mont’ when yuz wrote dat I wuz smoikin’ lak da Donald. Ah wuzn’t smoikin’ ‘n’ ah ain’t lak Trump. Ah don’ even lak dat guy. He’s nasty ta wimmen ‘n’ nearly ever’body, ‘cept his pal Voldemort Pootin.’ Ah wuz jes’ smilin’ cuz weah back on track on da wines.”

September 29, 2016 01:00 AM

When Adventure! Children’s Museum founder and board president Amelia Reising was home with her small son, they got a little stir crazy. “I’d stopped working and was hanging out with him, and we were just trying to get out of the house,” Reising recalls. 

When Adventure! Children’s Museum founder and board president Amelia Reising was home with her small son, they got a little stir crazy. “I’d stopped working and was hanging out with him, and we were just trying to get out of the house,” Reising recalls. 

September 29, 2016 01:00 AM

The Outsiders Ball — a mash-up of art, fashion, music and philanthropy — is about to celebrate its third year.

“I really wanted to start helping out abuse shelters,” says Tracy Sydor, host and local photographer (and occasional EW photo contributor), of the benefit’s origins. Sydor discovered Womenspace, a local nonprofit working to end domestic violence, and proceeds from the event have gone to the organization every year.

The Outsiders Ball — a mash-up of art, fashion, music and philanthropy — is about to celebrate its third year.

“I really wanted to start helping out abuse shelters,” says Tracy Sydor, host and local photographer (and occasional EW photo contributor), of the benefit’s origins. Sydor discovered Womenspace, a local nonprofit working to end domestic violence, and proceeds from the event have gone to the organization every year.

September 29, 2016 01:00 AM

Local designer Vanessa Froehling has denim on the brain. Stonewashed, herringbone print, chambray, stretch and black denim, to be sure.

In her home studio, Froehling flips through hangers of designs, including sailor-style high-waisted women’s shorts, a men’s blazer and a women’s jumpsuit.

Local designer Vanessa Froehling has denim on the brain. Stonewashed, herringbone print, chambray, stretch and black denim, to be sure.

In her home studio, Froehling flips through hangers of designs, including sailor-style high-waisted women’s shorts, a men’s blazer and a women’s jumpsuit.

September 22, 2016 01:00 AM

It makes me all fizzy and giddy to see men dress up like women. There’s something so joyously liberating about it all. And I don’t think I’m the only one who finds female impersonators a total hoot and super sexy. Gay, straight, bi, femme, butch, blah blah blah: Just about everyone I know gets chirpy at the sight of an aging queen squeezed into a sleek satin dress and bellowing “I Will Survive” like a diva in heat.

It makes me all fizzy and giddy to see men dress up like women. There’s something so joyously liberating about it all. And I don’t think I’m the only one who finds female impersonators a total hoot and super sexy. Gay, straight, bi, femme, butch, blah blah blah: Just about everyone I know gets chirpy at the sight of an aging queen squeezed into a sleek satin dress and bellowing “I Will Survive” like a diva in heat.

September 22, 2016 01:00 AM

Paris, September 1793: The Bastille has fallen, feudalism’s dead and the Rights of Man have been declared. (That all sounds pretty good, right?)

But wait, there’s more.

Paris, September 1793: The Bastille has fallen, feudalism’s dead and the Rights of Man have been declared. (That all sounds pretty good, right?)

But wait, there’s more:

Enter brilliant playwright Lauren Gunderson, who illuminates a murky, muddling moment in history with her bold new play, directed with strength and humor for Oregon Contemporary Theatre by Elizabeth Helman. 

September 15, 2016 01:00 AM

In a state like Oregon, where art classes are absent from a stunning portion of public schools, art nonprofits fill the gaps, tasked with cultivating communities and our youth in culture beyond football season. These art bodies are typically scrappy and chronically underfunded. To survive a decade is commendable. But to endure 40 years? That is nearing immortality. Lane Arts Council celebrates its ruby anniversary Friday, Sept. 16.

In a state like Oregon, where art classes are absent from a stunning portion of public schools, art nonprofits fill the gaps, tasked with cultivating communities and our youth in culture beyond football season. These art bodies are typically scrappy and chronically underfunded. To survive a decade is commendable. But to endure 40 years? That is nearing immortality. Lane Arts Council, Lane County’s arts nonprofit stalwart seated in Eugene, celebrates its ruby anniversary 6 to 9 pm Friday, Sept. 16, at the International Cafes at Fifth Street Public Market.

September 15, 2016 01:00 AM

Fall performance gets rolling with Dance in Dialogue’s D.i.D.#10 6 to 8 pm Sept. 29 at the Friends Meeting House. “Dance in Dialogue inspires the making and discussion of new work to invigorate the contemporary dance culture in Eugene, by providing a forum for artists to present innovative works-in-progress in a process-oriented setting with audience feedback,” D.i.D. co-founder Shannon Mockli says. Check it out. 

Fall performance gets rolling with Dance in Dialogue’s D.i.D.#10 6 to 8 pm Sept. 29 at the Friends Meeting House. “Dance in Dialogue inspires the making and discussion of new work to invigorate the contemporary dance culture in Eugene, by providing a forum for artists to present innovative works-in-progress in a process-oriented setting with audience feedback,” D.i.D. co-founder Shannon Mockli says. Check it out. 

See yourself in sweatpants? There are a number of community auditions and classes on tap: 

September 8, 2016 01:00 AM

I spent a half hour of my life watching YouTube videos of nearly naked men wiggling and worming around on stages illuminated by flashy lights — for research purposes, of course. Magic Men Live is coming to town and there’s something hypnotic about the performers’ abdominal capabilities.  

I spent a half hour of my life watching YouTube videos of nearly naked men wiggling and worming around on stages illuminated by flashy lights — for research purposes, of course. Magic Men Live is coming to town and there’s something hypnotic about the performers’ abdominal capabilities.  

Magic Men Live is a simulation of the 2012 Steven Soderbergh film Magic Mike but omits plot development and Channing Tatum. Each set of dancers in the performance is dressed according to a theme, so you can expect impractical firefighter uniforms and cowboy hats galore.   

September 8, 2016 01:00 AM

Half a century ago this world, as well as worlds beyond our solar system, fell in love with the ’60s television series-turned-movie franchise known as Star Trek.

Christina Allaback, creative director of Eugene’s Trek Theatre, says that along with the relationships among central characters like Kirk, Spock and McCoy, the show’s underlying message of hope helps Star Trek endure.

Half a century ago this world, as well as worlds beyond our solar system, fell in love with the ’60s television series-turned-movie franchise known as Star Trek.

Christina Allaback, creative director of Eugene’s Trek Theatre, says that along with the relationships among central characters like Kirk, Spock and McCoy, the show’s underlying message of hope helps Star Trek endure.

“There are dystopic science fiction stories,” Allaback explains. “With Star Trek you have the opposite of that — the possibilities of where the human race can go.”

September 8, 2016 01:00 AM

August went by in flash, as usual. Daily watering chores. Jam making. An ocean of applesauce.

After a week’s vacation in a cabin by the Metolius, I somehow carved out time to think about the fall and winter vegetable garden. Space must be carved out, too, and I’m grateful for any crops that can go in after the pole beans and tomatoes are torn out in October.

August went by in flash, as usual. Daily watering chores. Jam making. An ocean of applesauce.

After a week’s vacation in a cabin by the Metolius, I somehow carved out time to think about the fall and winter vegetable garden. Space must be carved out, too, and I’m grateful for any crops that can go in after the pole beans and tomatoes are torn out in October.

But starts of red Russian kale, my favorite for winter eating, need to go in as soon as possible. By October what you see is more or less what you get until growth starts up again in March.